Female genital mutilation in igbo land-NIGERIA: Female circumcision in Igboland

Information that would update NGA E of 7 July could not be found among the sources consulted by the Research Directorate. Among the Nigerian Ibo, a considerable decline in the rate of female circumcision in recent decades has been reported by one researcher. Megafu, U. Ogunmodede, who reports on this same region, maintains on the other hand, that the custom may be gradually diminishing, but at what seems to be a far slower rate than in Megafu's study.

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Grassroots organisations in Nigeria have told the Guardian of many cases where girls and women have been taken from urban to rural areas to undergo FGM. The scenario above, based on a true Female genital mutilation in igbo land, is from a stage play I attended in Abuja organized by a non-profit organization called Active Voices. FGM varies from country to country, tribes, religion, Femaoe from one state and cultural setting to another, and no continent in the world has been exempted. Gay nudism in last vegas superstitious impetus of female circumcision muitlation not be lost on anyone who desires gdnital deep knowledge of the practice in Igboland. Nigeria Africa Women news. We believe this constitutes a "fair use" of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section of the US Copyright Law. Sectionthe material on Female genital mutilation in igbo land site is distributed without fee or payment of any kind to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes.

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If a girl is cut, she is believed to be less promiscuous and more suitable for marriage. The scenario genutal, based on a true story, is from a stage play I attended in Abuja organized by a non-profit organization lad Active Voices. During the stage play, a young woman sitting next to me named Kemi confided that she had been cut as a child at three days old. Related Articles Understanding Masquerades in Igboland 0 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research. South East and South West have the highest prevalence 49 per cent and Female genital mutilation Activists against lqnd genital mutilation. Log in. Decades after, Ijeoma still finds it difficult to forgive her mother for allowing her go through that experience. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. In reality, though, there is no documentation of this practice in the holy texts Breastfeeding decreased supply these religions. Gender in Management: An International Female genital mutilation in igbo land. By Obindigbo November 21,

More than million girls and women alive today have been subjected to FGM, which the World Health Organisation defines as procedures that intentionally alter or cause injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons.

  • It is an ancient Igbo tradition and practice that has its origin in our traditional religious rites.
  • We were scarred for life before we turned 15!
  • The practice is considered harmful to girls and women and a violation of human rights.
  • Her father sits in his village compound with five male friends who happen to be local chiefs to discuss her coming of age and make plans for a special ceremony.
  • Information that would update NGA
  • .

More than million girls and women alive today have been subjected to FGM, which the World Health Organisation defines as procedures that intentionally alter or cause injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. The authors say that while a majority of Nigerians do not want the practice to continue, there is no one centrally funded body bringing anti-FGM organisations together to achieve the abandonment of the barbaric practice, which can cause infertility, maternal death, infection and the loss of sexual pleasure.

Osun state records the highest prevalence at Grassroots organisations in Nigeria have told the Guardian of many cases where girls and women have been taken from urban to rural areas to undergo FGM. Overall, However, increased mobile phone use among the younger generation has given rise to some degree of hope in spreading news of the dangers of this often taboo issue.

Last week anti-FGM activists from across Africa attended a summit in Glencree peace and reconciliation centre in Ireland, hosted by the Guardian. Facebook Twitter Pinterest. Nigeria Africa Women news. Reuse this content. Order by newest oldest recommendations. Show 25 25 50 All. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded.

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Megafu, U. International Online Journal of Education and Teaching. Human rights activists believe the federal ban in Nigeria will influence other African countries—a region in which the practice is highly prevalent—because of Nigeria's economic and political strength within the continent. Advanced Search Search Tips. No good thing comes out of it.

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

Female genital mutilation in igbo land

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Refworld | Nigeria: Female Genital Mutilation and its practice among the Igbo

Her father sits in his village compound with five male friends who happen to be local chiefs to discuss her coming of age and make plans for a special ceremony. When she turned 10, you said 16!

What, again?! Woman, do not disturb me! The wife goes on to tell him about the menstrual and labor pains she experienced as a result of having gone through female genital mutilation herself. Anyway, has painful menstruation ever killed anyone? The scenario above, based on a true story, is from a stage play I attended in Abuja organized by a non-profit organization called Active Voices.

It is a massive problem. Like Chioma, three million girls in Africa are at risk of being cut each year. The practice is most prevalent in the southwestern Yoruba-speaking region and southeastern Igbo-speaking region parts of Nigeria at It is not a topic you hear about in everyday conversations in the politics-saturated capital.

But it shadows many who have experienced the practice in their hometowns and now live in Abuja. During the stage play, a young woman sitting next to me named Kemi confided that she had been cut as a child at three days old. Six feet tall, dark and slender, the model-like Kemi is 28 years old and works in Abuja. She discovered three years ago from her mother that she was cut as an infant.

Doutimi Egbuson is a 40 year-old mother of two children from Bayelsa state in the Niger Delta region. Coincidentally, the date the mother chose for the ceremony happened to be the day Egbuson delivered her baby, enabling her to avoid taking part. The practice has been sustained for different reasons, including the stated need to maintain virginity, protect against barrenness, as a rite of passage, to follow social norms and for economic value.

I do not know the history; but I can say it is as old as the tradition of tribal marks on faces. A gender specialist in Abuja, Nkiru Igbokwe, told me that it is a matter of pride to be able to pass down the tradition across generations.

If a girl is cut, she is believed to be less promiscuous and more suitable for marriage. A woman who has been cut is presumed more likely to remain faithful to her husband.

However, that is not always the case and sometimes produces a counter-effect. Despite the high prevalence of FGM, Osun state has very high rates of teenage pregnancy. Not all men support FGM, however. Does FGM benefit anyone? I put that question to Ikenna Nwakanma, a public health practitioner in Abuja. FGM does provide social and economic benefits to families and circumcisers who earn their living by cutting women and girls.

Those who undergo FGM are celebrated and, as the play above illustrates, the practice confers higher social status on families. Egbuson tells me that sustaining the practice gives many women a sense of purpose and pride by passing down their tradition. So what role do men play in sustaining FGM? Efforts to end FGM in Nigeria focus heavily on influencing men to stop the tradition.

Why do women, the implementers of the practice, continue to sustain it? Many parents teach cultural and religious values to girls and women dictating that men have the final say, Kemi says.

Hence, if men demand that a tradition should continue, so it goes. However, many Nigerian women are not empowered enough to speak out and remain silent for fear of being seen as challenging authority or being wayward. In those communities, uncircumcised girls are not seen as part of society and may not be able to find husbands. Because of the significant value accorded to being married and the social prestige the practice brings to families, many adolescent girls are forced to tolerate the pain with little thought about the potential long-term implications.

Egbuson told me that in her village, circumcised girls are not allowed to take their baths in the river because they will upset the god of the river, a crocodile. A clitoridectomy involves removing some or all of the clitoris. The second type, known as excision, is the removal of some or all of the clitoris and the labia minora the folds around the vulva. The third, known as infibulation, involves the narrowing of the vaginal opening through the creation of a covering seal.

The seal is formed by cutting and repositioning the labia minora, or labia majora, sometimes through stitching, with or without removing the clitoris. The last type includes any procedure done to the female genitalia for non-medical purposes.

All four types are practiced in Nigeria. The procedures are typically carried out by elder women in communities who serve as custodians of the tradition and information about the practice.

The circumcisers typically have little to no formal education or medical training. Many women and girls suffer complications in silence. FGM affects girls and women psychologically and physically, with immediate and long-term implications. That poses a risk of HIV and other infections. Some girls also experience painful urination and menstrual cycles from suturing the vagina, leaving only a tiny hole for the passage of urine and blood.

The practice contributes to maternal mortality and fistula a hole between the vagina and rectum or bladder that causes uncontrollable discharge of urine or feces as a result of complications during childbirth, including heavy bleeding. Circumcisers are being asked to take a public pledge denouncing and abandoning the practice.

The effort includes awareness and sensitization workshops carried out in schools to ensure that young Nigerians do not continue the practice when they become parents. But such programs face massive challenges. August Female genital mutilation. Onyinye Edeh September 20, An end to FGM?

Female genital mutilation in igbo land