Lilac breasted rooler bird-Best Lilac Breasted Roller images | Lilac breasted roller, Colorful birds, Beautiful birds

The lilac-breasted roller Coracias caudatus is an African member of the roller or Coraciidae family of birds. It is widely distributed in sub-Saharan Africa , and is a vagrant to the southern Arabian Peninsula. Usually found alone or in pairs, it perches conspicuously at the tops of trees, poles or other high vantage points from where it can spot insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, small birds and rodents moving about on the ground. During the breeding season the male will rise to a fair height 69 to metres , descending in swoops and dives, [3] while uttering harsh, discordant cries. The sexes are different in coloration, and juveniles lack the long tail streamers of adults.

Lilac breasted rooler bird

Lilac breasted rooler bird

Lilac breasted rooler bird

They take prey from the ground. Slow-moving lizards, chameleons and snakes, and the blind, burrowing Afrotyphlops and Leptotyphlops species are especially vulnerable to them when crossing roads. Visiting wildlife refuges and preserves in the bird's range, especially where there are tall, scattered trees, can help birders be sure of stunning sightings. She lived in Ecuador for 6 bjrd and explored the Galapagos Islands. They are partly migratory, but in some areas they are sedentary. Looking for some facts about the gorgeous lilac breasted roller? They may stay in small family groups during the Lilac breasted rooler bird.

Manatee lovers web stie. Coracias caudatus

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Coracias caudatus. In subspecies C. The tail is narrow and of medium length. The shoulder of the wing, outer webs of the flight feathers and the rump are all violet. Fowler's Zoo and Wild Animal Medicine, 8. The beauty of these birds and how they attract tourists to the region are great sources of pride in both countries, even without official recognition. Lilac-throated rollers breed from late April to mid-September in Somalia, while lilac-breasted rollers breed at various times of the year, depending on the location. The birds have exclusively adapted Register nurse dalary one natural disaster. The throat is lilac, and some lilac-throated rollers have a lilac patch or rufous-brown tinges on the lower abdomen. African Journal of Ecology. These birds do not typically stay near human habitation, but leaving isolated trees or poles available for tall perches can tempt them to visit, especially in less populated regions. Lilac Lilac breasted rooler bird Roller normally found alone or in pairs.

Looking for some facts about the gorgeous lilac breasted roller?

  • The colorful Lilac Breasted Roller or Coracias caudatus is a member of the roller family of birds.
  • The national bird of both Kenya and Botswana , the lilac-breasted roller is often considered one of the most beautiful birds in the world with its pastel plumage , striking field marks, and long tail streamers.
  • Most of us are quite aware that the Lilac-breasted roller is the national bird of Kenya, but how many of us have stopped to learn the unique facts about the stunningly pretty bird that stands out in colour from other birds?

Looking for some facts about the gorgeous lilac breasted roller? You're in the right place! It is a strong and swift flier. Read on to learn all about it!

The lilac-breasted roller has a robust body and a proportionately large, green head with a heavy black beak. It has a white chin and a white or yellow band above the eyes and beak. Its breast is a dark lilac that grows lighter towards the throat.

The upper part of the wings is reddish brown. Their forked tail, which is also turquoise, ends in black streamers. Watch on YouTube. Males and females have the same coloring. As they reach maturity, their throats and breasts will turn lilac. Like other members of the roller family, the lilac-breasted roller has syndactyl feet with the second and third toes fused together. While its upper legs have turquoise feathers, its lower legs and feet are bare, scaly, and yellowish.

That is one colorful bird! Rollers, in general, owe their common name to their mating display, which consists of a lot of dives and swoops accompanied by loud and harsh cries.

During a mating flight, a lilac-breasted roller will fly upwards for about ten meters 33 feet and then swoop down with wings closed. In another aerial stunt, the lilac-breasted roller will roll from side to side while flying very fast. If the aerial courtship is successful, the two birds will mate in the air. A lilac-breasted roller can be 36 to 38 cm The lilac-breasted roller has an average weight of grams 3.

The males are slightly larger than the females. They also guard their favorite hunting grounds and will chase off intruders. Lilac-breasted rollers have an average life expectancy of around ten years in the wild, and captive birds can live somewhat longer. They are ready to breed when they are around two years old. Various birds of prey are the main predators of the lilac-breasted roller. The lilac-breasted roller is not currently listed as endangered. Lilac-breasted rollers eat mainly insects like beetles and grasshoppers.

They will also take snails, scorpions, and sometimes small lizards, rodents, and other birds. Lilac-breasted rollers like to perch on high treetops or telephone poles to watch for their prey. When they see something, they will swoop down and batter their target with their wings.

After beating their prey into submission, they will swallow it whole. One of the cooler lilac breasted roller facts is that these birds are clever and bold enough to take advantage of brush fires. As various small animals and insects flee the flames, the lilac-breasted roller will swoop down on them.

In fact, lilac-breasted rollers will hunt near the edge of a fire. It's hard to believe that such a pretty little bird could have something in common with the marabou stork! The Latin or scientific name of the lilac-breasted roller is Coracias caudatus. The Swedish scientist Carl Linnaeus gave this cool bird its scientific name in There are two subspecies, C.

Confusingly, the last name is also sometimes used for a subspecies of the purple roller Coracias naevius. Lilac-breasted rollers are believed to be monogamous and mate for life. In the wild, adults are usually found by themselves or in pairs. They may stay in small family groups during the winter. The lilac-breasted roller typically lays between two and four eggs that are plain white.

Both parents take turns caring for the eggs, which hatch after 22 to 24 days. It takes about 19 days for their feathers to grow in fully. The chicks will remain with their parents for another month. Lilac-breasted rollers produce loud and harsh calls. Some people have compared the noise to that of a steam train.

The lilac-breasted roller lives mainly in sub-Saharan Africa and can also be found in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula. The lilac-breasted roller prefers to live in savannas and open woodlands where it has access to trees for perching and nesting. Conversely, it avoids treeless areas. While it does not fear humans, the lilac-breasted roller avoids environments that have been affected by humans, like cities and farms.

The lilac-breasted roller likes to nest in trees. It will look for a tree with a natural hole and lay its eggs inside the hole. It might also nest in termite mounds. Both parents will aggressively defend the nest from raptors and other predators. You can see the lilac-breasted roller in a zoo. The lilac-breasted roller is particularly common in Kenya. The national bird of Kenya is the rooster and lilac breasted roller.

The lilac breasted roller can be found almost anywhere in the country. Even though Botswana doesn't have an official national bird , it is generally thought to be the lilac breasted roller. The lilac-breasted roller is common, unafraid of humans, and boasts spectacular plumage — a near-perfect bird as far as birders are concerned. The lilac-breasted roller has appeared in the folklore of some African cultures. Some African tribes historically considered the lilac-breasted roller to be a symbol of peace, and their kings would sacrifice it to celebrate the end of a war.

A couple who wanted to marry had to be tied together with a feathery chain. The belief that the lilac-breasted roller mates for life may have inspired the various marriage traditions.

We hope you've enjoyed learning about this beautiful bird! Which fact was your favorite? Did we miss one? Let us know in the comments! Drew Haines is an animal enthusiast, travel writer, and content marketer. She loves to share her passion through her writing. She lived in Ecuador for 6 years and explored the Galapagos Islands.

Currently based in N. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed. What bird would like to see me cover? Please tell me in the comments and I will do my best to write about them. As an Amazon Associate, we earn from qualifying purchases. Just Birding is a community for birders. When you use my links, I may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more. Table of Contents. The lilac-breasted roller can live anywhere between sea level and up to a little over meters feet above sea level.

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Retrieved October 14, The lilac-breasted roller lives mainly in sub-Saharan Africa and can also be found in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula. If the aerial courtship is successful, the two birds will mate in the air. It is one of eight species in genus Coracias , a group native to the open woodlands of western Eurasia and Africa. They are territorial, also defending temporarily small feeding territories; hence individuals are regularly spaced along roads. Less often they frequent riverine vegetation and light forest, and may enter subdesert steppe [6] or open grassland where any elevated perches may be used. The bill is black and the eyes are brown.

Lilac breasted rooler bird

Lilac breasted rooler bird. Appearance

They are ready to breed when they are around two years old. Various birds of prey are the main predators of the lilac-breasted roller. The lilac-breasted roller is not currently listed as endangered. Lilac-breasted rollers eat mainly insects like beetles and grasshoppers. They will also take snails, scorpions, and sometimes small lizards, rodents, and other birds.

Lilac-breasted rollers like to perch on high treetops or telephone poles to watch for their prey. When they see something, they will swoop down and batter their target with their wings. After beating their prey into submission, they will swallow it whole. One of the cooler lilac breasted roller facts is that these birds are clever and bold enough to take advantage of brush fires.

As various small animals and insects flee the flames, the lilac-breasted roller will swoop down on them. In fact, lilac-breasted rollers will hunt near the edge of a fire. It's hard to believe that such a pretty little bird could have something in common with the marabou stork! The Latin or scientific name of the lilac-breasted roller is Coracias caudatus. The Swedish scientist Carl Linnaeus gave this cool bird its scientific name in There are two subspecies, C.

Confusingly, the last name is also sometimes used for a subspecies of the purple roller Coracias naevius. Lilac-breasted rollers are believed to be monogamous and mate for life. In the wild, adults are usually found by themselves or in pairs. They may stay in small family groups during the winter. The lilac-breasted roller typically lays between two and four eggs that are plain white.

Both parents take turns caring for the eggs, which hatch after 22 to 24 days. It takes about 19 days for their feathers to grow in fully. The chicks will remain with their parents for another month. Lilac-breasted rollers produce loud and harsh calls. Some people have compared the noise to that of a steam train.

The lilac-breasted roller lives mainly in sub-Saharan Africa and can also be found in the southern part of the Arabian Peninsula. The lilac-breasted roller prefers to live in savannas and open woodlands where it has access to trees for perching and nesting. Conversely, it avoids treeless areas. While it does not fear humans, the lilac-breasted roller avoids environments that have been affected by humans, like cities and farms.

The lilac-breasted roller likes to nest in trees. It will look for a tree with a natural hole and lay its eggs inside the hole. It might also nest in termite mounds. Both parents will aggressively defend the nest from raptors and other predators. You can see the lilac-breasted roller in a zoo. The lilac-breasted roller is particularly common in Kenya. The national bird of Kenya is the rooster and lilac breasted roller. The lilac breasted roller can be found almost anywhere in the country.

Even though Botswana doesn't have an official national bird , it is generally thought to be the lilac breasted roller. The lilac-breasted roller is common, unafraid of humans, and boasts spectacular plumage — a near-perfect bird as far as birders are concerned. The lilac-breasted roller has appeared in the folklore of some African cultures.

Some African tribes historically considered the lilac-breasted roller to be a symbol of peace, and their kings would sacrifice it to celebrate the end of a war. A couple who wanted to marry had to be tied together with a feathery chain. The belief that the lilac-breasted roller mates for life may have inspired the various marriage traditions. We hope you've enjoyed learning about this beautiful bird! Juveniles are dull overall with shades of brown and tan but develop adult colors quickly, though they lack the outer tail streamers.

These rollers have a harsh, raspy call that lasts less than a second but may be quickly repeated. The pitch does not vary, and the tone has a rattling quality. While mostly silent, they are more vocal during the breeding season or when they feel their territory is threatened. These birds prefer open woodland or grassland habitat with widely scattered trees, shrubs, or poles to serve as hunting perches.

They are relatively common and widespread throughout much of southern Africa, south of the Congo River basin but extending as far north as Ethiopia in the eastern part of the continent. They are absent from coastal areas of southwestern Africa. Lilac-breasted rollers do not typically migrate but may be somewhat nomadic in search of the best food sources in different seasons or times of drought.

Vagrant sightings are regularly recorded in the southern part of the Arabian peninsula, specifically Oman and Yemen. These birds are typically solitary or are found in pairs, but may stay in small family groups during the winter months. All rollers, including the lilac-breasted, are known for their acrobatic, agile flight, aided by the tail streamers they are able to use as rudders while flying.

Lilac-breasted rollers perch on high vantage points at the very tops of trees and poles, and stay still while watching for prey to approach.

After dropping onto a victim, they may beat their prey against a rock or on the ground to kill it before swallowing it whole. These are carnivorous birds and hunt a variety of small prey, including insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, amphibians, rodents, and even small birds. These are monogamous birds believed to mate for life. The male's courtship displays include stunning flight dives with a rolling or rocking quality as well as loops and twists.

These are cavity-nesting birds that usurp old kingfisher or woodpecker holes from feet above the ground, and will occasionally nest in empty termite mounds. Both genders aggressively defend their nesting territory, even chasing off much larger raptors and other predators. The eggs are plain white with eggs per brood , and only one brood is laid per year. Both parents share incubation duties for days, and after hatching, they continue to care for the altricial young for another days.

Once the chicks have left the nest, they continue to rely on parental care for up to another month. These birds are not considered threatened or endangered, though habitat preservation can help keep their population numbers stable.

Poaching for the pet trade is a minor threat that can have severe consequences for local breeding populations. Lilac-breasted rollers have uniquely adapted to one natural disaster.

While brush fires can be devastating to many animals and birds, these rollers will deliberately hunt near the edges of fires where panicked prey is fleeing and less wary of predators.

Lilac-breasted Roller

The national bird of both Kenya and Botswana , the lilac-breasted roller is often considered one of the most beautiful birds in the world with its pastel plumage , striking field marks, and long tail streamers. It is one of the most colorful members of the Coraciidae bird family, and more than one visitor in Africa searching for mammals leaves the continent a birder, naming this attractive species as their spark bird.

This informative fact sheet can help you better understand just how amazing this bird is. This bird's stunning appearance may seem unmistakable, but there are several roller species that share similar habitats and ranges. It is best for birders to learn the key field marks that distinguish the lilac-breasted roller to be sure of the bird's identification. Genders are similar with a white or creamy buff face with a dark eye line and prominent bristles at the base of the thick, black bill.

The chin is creamy white, the cheeks are dark tan with a purple wash, and the throat and upper breast are purple, most often a lilac shade but with some hue variation and darker shades lower on the body. The throat and upper breast also show thin white vertical streaks. The upper wings and back are tan, but the shoulders and primary feathers are rich, royal blue. The underparts are bright turquoise. The tail is blue with black outer streamers. In flight, the wings show a light blue leading edge and wingpit contrasting strongly with a dark blue primary and secondary feathers.

Legs and feet are greenish yellow. Juveniles are dull overall with shades of brown and tan but develop adult colors quickly, though they lack the outer tail streamers. These rollers have a harsh, raspy call that lasts less than a second but may be quickly repeated.

The pitch does not vary, and the tone has a rattling quality. While mostly silent, they are more vocal during the breeding season or when they feel their territory is threatened.

These birds prefer open woodland or grassland habitat with widely scattered trees, shrubs, or poles to serve as hunting perches. They are relatively common and widespread throughout much of southern Africa, south of the Congo River basin but extending as far north as Ethiopia in the eastern part of the continent. They are absent from coastal areas of southwestern Africa. Lilac-breasted rollers do not typically migrate but may be somewhat nomadic in search of the best food sources in different seasons or times of drought.

Vagrant sightings are regularly recorded in the southern part of the Arabian peninsula, specifically Oman and Yemen. These birds are typically solitary or are found in pairs, but may stay in small family groups during the winter months.

All rollers, including the lilac-breasted, are known for their acrobatic, agile flight, aided by the tail streamers they are able to use as rudders while flying. Lilac-breasted rollers perch on high vantage points at the very tops of trees and poles, and stay still while watching for prey to approach. After dropping onto a victim, they may beat their prey against a rock or on the ground to kill it before swallowing it whole.

These are carnivorous birds and hunt a variety of small prey, including insects, lizards, scorpions, snails, amphibians, rodents, and even small birds. These are monogamous birds believed to mate for life. The male's courtship displays include stunning flight dives with a rolling or rocking quality as well as loops and twists. These are cavity-nesting birds that usurp old kingfisher or woodpecker holes from feet above the ground, and will occasionally nest in empty termite mounds.

Both genders aggressively defend their nesting territory, even chasing off much larger raptors and other predators. The eggs are plain white with eggs per brood , and only one brood is laid per year. Both parents share incubation duties for days, and after hatching, they continue to care for the altricial young for another days. Once the chicks have left the nest, they continue to rely on parental care for up to another month. These birds are not considered threatened or endangered, though habitat preservation can help keep their population numbers stable.

Poaching for the pet trade is a minor threat that can have severe consequences for local breeding populations. Lilac-breasted rollers have uniquely adapted to one natural disaster. While brush fires can be devastating to many animals and birds, these rollers will deliberately hunt near the edges of fires where panicked prey is fleeing and less wary of predators. These birds do not typically stay near human habitation, but leaving isolated trees or poles available for tall perches can tempt them to visit, especially in less populated regions.

Where other nesting sites are scarce, they may use larger nesting boxes. Minimizing the use of pesticides and insecticides can help preserve food sources for lilac-breasted rollers. In the field, lilac-breasted rollers are unafraid when humans approach and it can be easy to get spectacular views and photographs.

Visiting wildlife refuges and preserves in the bird's range, especially where there are tall, scattered trees, can help birders be sure of stunning sightings. These colorful birds are considered the national birds of both Kenya and Botswana, though the designation is only unofficial and neither nation has an official national bird. In both countries, lilac-breasted rollers can be seen nearly everywhere, though they are missing from some northwestern regions of Kenya.

The beauty of these birds and how they attract tourists to the region are great sources of pride in both countries, even without official recognition.

There are many other colorful rollers to enjoy, or birders can look for other multi-colored, rainbow-hued birds such as the reddest birds in the world , the world's most beautiful pigeons and doves , or even birds with orange plumage. Be sure to check out all our other amazing bird profiles to see more of your favorite species in every color!

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Lilac breasted rooler bird