Models of cognition-Frontiers | Quantum-like modeling of cognition | Physics

Models of cognition address properties of the mind by formulating cognitive processes such as memory, perception, inference, and comprehension of language. Dynamical models of cognition ascribe importance to time and complexity, both of which bring context to behavior. Temporal processes bring into the moment the possibility of memory, feedback, the effects of nonlinear recursion, and the generation of expectation. Complexity brings the possibility of stable patterns of coordination emerging from interaction of subprocesses. It focuses on the manner in which each model treats time and complexity, thought, and action.

Models of cognition

Models of cognition

Models of cognition

Models of cognition

Models of cognition

Despite its name, the latter is not an observable Models of cognition sein the colloquial sense of the word. Oliva, S. In fact this way of seeing the situation provides an even better parallel here. Google Scholar. Biosystems 95 — We also found that these coefficients are bound by 1, so behavior is trigonometricsee Appendix Models of cognition in Supplementary Material. Phys Scr. The coefficient of interference expressed in the probabilistic terms, cognitikn Equation 9 Section 4 can be interpreted as quantitative measure of non-classicality non-Kolmogorovness.

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Chapters Introduction A brief introduction to the cognitikn. Cognitive Models of cognition therapy is based on a cognitive theory of psychopathology. Events that process the input signal are referred to as input processes, whereas events that process the production of speech are referred to as output processes. International Journal of Bifurcation and Chaos, ocgnition 4 In the traditional computational approachrepresentations are viewed as static structures of discrete symbols. A groundbreaking argument challenging the traditional linguistic representational model of cognition proposes that representational states Horny gay asians be conceptualized as the cognitive equivalent of Models of cognition models. One proposed mechanism of a dynamical system comes from analysis of continuous-time recurrent neural networks CTRNNs. In most cases, this involves the study of humans, partly for the obvious self-interest and partly because humans appear to have the most advanced cobnition skills of any animal. Elman networks were trained with simple sentences to represent grammar as a dynamical system. Cognition takes place by transforming static symbol structures in discretesequential steps.

This paper begins with a historical review of the mutual influence of physics and psychology, from Freud's invention of psychic energy inspired by von Boltzmann' thermodynamics to the enrichment quantum physics gained from the side of psychology by the notion of complementarity the invention of Niels Bohr who was inspired by William James , besides we consider the resonance of the correspondence between Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung in both physics and psychology.

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  • This book explores the probabilistic approach to cognitive science, which models learning and reasoning as inference in complex probabilistic models.

Models of cognition address properties of the mind by formulating cognitive processes such as memory, perception, inference, and comprehension of language. Dynamical models of cognition ascribe importance to time and complexity, both of which bring context to behavior. Temporal processes bring into the moment the possibility of memory, feedback, the effects of nonlinear recursion, and the generation of expectation. Complexity brings the possibility of stable patterns of coordination emerging from interaction of subprocesses.

It focuses on the manner in which each model treats time and complexity, thought, and action. Skip to main content. Advertisement Hide. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves. This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. Brain Sci. Port, T. Port, A. Zednik: The nature of dynamical explanation, Philos. Freeman: Nonlinear brain dynamics and intention according to aquinas, Mind Matter 6 2 , — Google Scholar.

Guastello, M. Koopmans, D. Pincus Eds. Press, New York Google Scholar. Guastello, R. Gregson Eds. Haken, J. Kelso, H. Oliva, S. Life Sci. Cox, R. Shiffrin: Criterion setting and the dynamics of recognition memory, Top.

Anderson, D. Bothell, M. Byrne, S. Douglass, C. Lebiere, Y. Qin: An integrated theory of the mind, Psychol. Gregson, S. Guastello: Introduction to nonlinear systems analysis.

Metzger: Multiprocess models of cognitive and behavioral dynamics. Hsiao, H. Smith, E. Wilson: Six views of embodied cognition, Psychon. Galantucci, C.

Fowler, M. Turvey: The motor theory of speech perception reviewed, Psychon. Hesslow: The current state of simulation theory of cognition, Brain Res. Neurosci, Thought , 71—79 Google Scholar. Hills, R. Dukas: The evolution of cognitive search. Todd, T. Hills, T. Personalised recommendations. Cite chapter How to cite? ENW EndNote. Buy options.

In contrast to previous work on central pattern generators, this framework suggests that stable behavioral patterns are an emergent, self-organizing property of the agent-environment system rather than determined by the structure of either the agent or the environment. The second function transforms the information from the environment i. Child Development, 72 5 , Partnering for Change Model P4C. Request Permissions Exam copy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 21,

Models of cognition

Models of cognition. Recommended

A Bradford Book. A groundbreaking argument challenging the traditional linguistic representational model of cognition proposes that representational states should be conceptualized as the cognitive equivalent of scale models. In this groundbreaking book, Jonathan Waskan challenges cognitive science's dominant model of mental representation and proposes a novel, well-devised alternative.

The traditional view in the cognitive sciences uses a linguistic propositional model of mental representation. This logic-based model of cognition informs and constrains both the classical tradition of artificial intelligence and modeling in the connectionist tradition. It falls short, however, when confronted by the frame problem—the lack of a principled way to determine which features of a representation must be updated when new information becomes available.

Proposed alternatives, including the imagistic model, have not so far resolved this problem. Waskan proposes instead the Intrinsic Cognitive Models ICM hypothesis, which argues that representational states can be conceptualized as the cognitive equivalent of scale models.

Waskan argues further that the proposal that humans harbor and manipulate these cognitive counterparts to scale models offers the only viable explanation for what most clearly differentiates humans from other creatures: their capacity to engage in truth-preserving manipulation of representations.

Finally, there is a book that puts explanation in its place: in cognition. Intrinsic Cognitive Models ICMs denote the way people understand phenomena by thinking in terms of the mechanisms by which the phenomena may be produced.

In Models and Cognition Waskan explores this most promising data. Every now and then a book comes along that tries to put it all together. Waskan's book is eminently readable and well informed and taught me a lot about stuff I thought I already knew.

It is an accessible text and a thoroughly original contribution all in one. Cognitive psychology became of great importance in the mids. Several factors were important in this:. Disatisfaction with the behaviorist approach in its simple emphasis on external behavior rather than internal processes.

Comparison between human and computer processing of information. The emphasis of psychology shifted away from the study of conditioned behavior and psychoanalytical notions about the study of the mind, towards the understanding of human information processing, using strict and rigorous laboratory investigation.

Behaviourists rejected the idea of studying the mind because internal mental processes cannot be observed and objectively measured. However, cognitive psychologists regard it as essential to look at the mental processes of an organism and how these influence behaviour.

Cognitive psychologists follow the example of the behaviourists in preferring objective, controlled, scientific methods for investigating behaviour. They use the results of their investigations as the basis for making inferences about mental processes. Information processing in humans resembles that in computers, and is based on based on transforming information, storing information and retrieving information from memory.

Information processing models of cognitive processes such as memory and attention assume that mental processes follow a clear sequence.

Storage processes cover everything that happens to stimuli internally in the brain and can include coding and manipulation of the stimuli.

Dynamical Models of Cognition | SpringerLink

This paper begins with a historical review of the mutual influence of physics and psychology, from Freud's invention of psychic energy inspired by von Boltzmann' thermodynamics to the enrichment quantum physics gained from the side of psychology by the notion of complementarity the invention of Niels Bohr who was inspired by William James , besides we consider the resonance of the correspondence between Wolfgang Pauli and Carl Jung in both physics and psychology.

Then we turn to the problem of development of mathematical models for laws of thought starting with Boolean logic and progressing toward foundations of classical probability theory. Interestingly, the laws of classical logic and probability are routinely violated not only by quantum statistical phenomena but by cognitive phenomena as well. This is yet another common feature between quantum physics and psychology.

In particular, cognitive data can exhibit a kind of the probabilistic interference effect. This similarity with quantum physics convinced a multi-disciplinary group of scientists physicists, psychologists, economists, sociologists to apply the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics to modeling of cognition. We illustrate this activity by considering a few concrete phenomena: the order and disjunction effects, recognition of ambiguous figures, categorization-decision making.

Recently, scientists working in various disciplines physicists, psychologists, economists, sociologists started to apply the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics QM , [ 1 , 2 ] especially quantum probability calculus [ 3 ] based on Born's rule , to multi-disciplinary problems [ 4 — 36 ].

Some elaborate that the apparatus of QM is relevant to micro phenomena only though this viewpoint is debatable even in the quantum physics community. One aim of this paper is to convince physicists, especially those working in the quantum information theory and quantum probability, that applications of the methods of QM to cognition can be justified. One of the best known examples is the impact made by psychology on QM which resulted in borrowing the principle of complementarity [ 37 ] by Niels Bohr from William James' book [ 38 ], see also books of Plotnitsky [ 39 — 41 ].

It may be less known that, in turn, the idea of complementarity was elaborated by James under the influence of the 19th century studies in thermodynamics which led him as well as later Freud [ 42 , 43 ] to the notion of psychic energy ; initially, complementarity in psychology was about complementarity of different representations of psychic energy [ 38 ].

Meanwhile, we point out that quantum-like modeling of cognition considered here must be distinguished from theories of physical quantum brain in the spirit of Hameroff [ 44 ], Penrose [ 45 , 46 ]. We work in the purely operational framework: it was found that some experimental studies in cognitive psychology, economics, and social science generate statistical data which match well quantum description of measurements and the corresponding probabilistic outputs see e.

Therefore, it is natural to model cognition with the aid of QM formalism. The quantum cognition project does not try to explain the physiological origin of quantum rules for information processing and probability, similarly to Copenhageners in QM following Bohr [ 37 ]. As in physics, this approach does not exclude a possibility to go beyond the operational quantum formalism.

In this paper we also mark the turning points in the development of mathematical models for laws of thought starting with the book of Boole [ 48 ] and considering the foundations of classical probability theory as established by Kolmogorov [ 49 ] in Then, we briefly review the violations of the laws of classical logic and probability in quantum statistical experiments, in particular we discuss the probabilistic structure of the two slit experiment [ 50 ] and adress no-go theorems [ 1 , 51 , 52 ] von Neumann, Kochen-Specker, Bell , see also [ 53 ].

We demonstrate that such violations including the interference effect also occur in statistics collected in cognitive experiments. This similarity with effects in quantum physics convinced scientists from physics and cognitive science to apply the mathematical apparatus of QM to modeling of cognition.

For illustration we use two concrete applications [ 12 — 18 ]: the order and disjunction effects. The paper is concluded with a short review of recent research in quantum -like cognition, in particular, cognitive applications of the theory of open quantum systems [ 23 , 24 , 30 , 31 ] and positive operator valued measures [ 4 , 7 , 36 ].

We remark that the use of the mathematical apparatus of QM for problems of cognition is motivated not only by the existence of non-classical statistical data collected in cognitive psychology, but also by similarities of basic features of 1 states of a system under study and 2 possible observations performed on the system, in physics and cognition.

First feature concerns the representation of a state e. In quantum -like modeling of cognition, superpositions play the crucial role because they represent states of very deep uncertainty which can not be modeled by classical probability distributions.

Secondly, the representation of incompatible quantum physical observables by non-commuting operators also corresponds well to psychological intuition, since the majority of observables used in psychology, in particular, in the theory of decision making, exhibit the order effect.

The property of entanglement of the states of two or more different systems is crucial for most peculiar QM effects such as quantum teleportation and quantum computing. Entanglement also plays an important role in cognitive studies but as an exhibition of contextuality of cognitive phenomena in the spirit of Cabello [ 54 ] rather than physical non-locality see also [ 53 , 55 — 58 ].

The problem of a proper interpretation of a quantum state represented by a wave function is still one of the most intriguing problems of quantum foundations [ 53 ]. The present situation is characterized by a huge diversity of interpretations which can be considered as a sign of deep foundational crisis. Working with applications of the QM formalism in new fields of science one also meets this problem. In QM there are, roughly speaking, two big classes of interpretations: a quantum state is a physical state of an individual system; b quantum state is a special probabilistic representation of information about the results of possible measurements on an ensemble of identically prepared systems.

The first one can be called the physical interpretation and the second one the information interpretation. Recently, the latter became very popular in quantum information theory and led in its extreme forms to subjective interpretation of quantum states, including quantum Bayesianism of Fuchs [ 59 — 61 ] and the information interpretation of Zeilinger [ 62 , 63 ], Brukner [ 64 ].

Such interpretations match the ideology of quantum -like cognition. Though, as we have seen in QM, the problem of interpretation is very complex, and it would be too risky to try to fix firmly the interpretation of quantum -like states used in cognitive studies.

Meanwhile, there is one crucial difference between conventional QM and quantum cognition. In QM, in accordance with Bohr's views, there is a system and an observer, the latter considered as external with respect to the system.

This ideology, although working successfully in experimental studies of micro-world phenomena, is problematical where the possibility of separation between a system under observation and the observer is questionable, e. In fact, in quantum cognition we meet the same problem. The brain is a self-observer ; here it is not easy to separate the system under measurement from the observer.

However, it seems that the information interpretation in the spirit of Zeilinger-Brukner-Fuchs gives a possibility to resolve it: in the brain, one information subsystem makes predictions about the result of the observation on another information subsystem.

In this paper, we do not keep to any fixed interpretation, while we are most sympathetic to the information interpretation. At the same time we are very cautious maybe, too cautious with respect to the use of the many worlds interpretation for quantum cognition, in spite of novel possibilities and yet unexplored ways.

Reviewing a variety of definitions from dictionaries and encyclopedias, we believe that we can safely state the following. Physics is the science that deals with the properties of matter. Psychology is the science that deals with mental processes and behavior. In accordance with the views of Rene Descartes there are two basic types of substance, material and mental, and one is not reduced to the other 1. Although during the last century physical reductionism captured the headlines in psychology, Descartes' ideology still penetrates the body of modern science.

Naturally, physics and psychology are considered as different fields of science as they can be, each with its specific theoretical and experimental methodologies. It seems that there is nothing or very little in common between them. Most physics students would probably not like to spend their time studying psychology courses and vice versa.

However, developments in physics and psychology are connected much stronger than one can imagine. Freud was strongly influenced by works of von Helmholtz on thermodynamics and especially on the energy conservation law 2. He noted similarities between thermodynamics and the human psyche and developed a kind of mental thermodynamics known as psycho-dynamics [ 42 , 43 ].

Freud actively used the notion of psychic energy libido and the law of its conservation. Primarily libido represents the sexual energy. However, according to Freud, the sexual energy is one of the forms of the psychic energy which can be transformed into other forms. At the first stage of his psycho-dynamical studies Freud was influenced by the ideas of Fechner: considering physical facts related to human body and mental facts as sides of one reality.

Fechner concluded that both physical and mental phenomena has to be described by the same mathematical apparatus [ 65 ]. This remark is very important for us as foretelling the main idea of this paper: behavior of both mind and matter nicely fits the framework of the mathematical formalism of quantum theory. The notion of psychic energy played an important role in theorizing of James [ 38 ].

Following physicists who at that time were already using the field theory he started to operate with the notion of psychic field. This psychic field as well as a physical field can have different modes. This analogy led James [ 38 ] to the fundamental principle of complementary of information belonging to different modes of consciousness the words of James are italicized :.

More remarkable still, they are complementary. Give an object to one of the consciousnesses, and by this very act you remove it from the other or others. Barring a certain common fund of information, like the command of language, etc.

However, the opposite also took place. Now we point to the famous correspondence between Pauli and Jung [ 66 ] on comparative analysis of foundations of physics and psychology. These letters were written in a free style of discussion between friends and, in part, a patient and a psychoanalyst 3. This freedom allowed them to express in psychoanalytic manner many thoughts which would be never presented in formal scientific discussions and publications.

From the letters it is clear that Jung was deeply influenced by quantum theory in Pauli's presentation; e. This …obliged us to abandon, on the plane of atomic magnitudes, a causal description of nature in the ordinary space-time system, and in its place to set up invisible fields of probability in multidimensional spaces.

Inspired by acausal features of quantum mechanics, Jung developed his famous theory of synchronicity [ 67 ]; the theory about the experiences of two or more events as meaningfully related, where they are unlikely to be causally related The subject sees it as a meaningful coincidence.

This was a clue to unification of psychic and quantum physical fields in one psycho-physical field. The idea was very appealing to both Pauli and Jung and it was one of the topics of their correspondence. Jung also discussed field models with Einstein, and Einstein's attempts to create a unified pure field model of physical reality see e. Finally, however, neither the Einstein dream about a purely field description of physical reality nor the Jung-Pauli dream about the unified quantum psycho-physical field found a rigorous mathematical realization.

Our discussion on mutual influence of physics and psychology can be shortly represented as the following of course, incomplete diagram:. Now we concentrate on problems in cognition keeping in mind our ultimate goal—the quantum modeling in cognitive psychology. We shall use mathematics as an instrument for linkage of cognition and physics.

This was the first mathematical model of the thinking process based on the laws of reasoning nowadays known as the Boolean logic. The role of Boolean logic in modern science is impossible to overestimate, it plays the crucial role in information theory, decision making, artificial intelligence, digital electronics.

Boolean logic is the basic mathematical model of classical logic. Thus, the first lesson for a physics student is that by applying any theorem of probability theory, e.

The set-theoretic model of probability was presented by Kolmogorov in [ 49 ]; it is based on the following two natural from the Boolean viewpoint axioms:. In classical probability theory random variables represent observables. Thus, the second lesson for a physics student is that probability is an axiomatic theory , as, e. My experience of probabilistic discussions with physicists is that only a few of them understand this. Majority tries to treat probability heuristically, e.

This approach may work well in applied research, e. However, it may lead to paradoxic conclusions in foundational studies, as e. One of the basic laws of the Kolmogorovian model, the formula of total probability FTP , will play very important role in our further considerations. Before addressing FTP, we point to an exceptional role which is played by conditional probability in the Kolmogorov model. By Kolmogorov's interpretation it is the probability of an event B to occur under the condition that an event C has occurred.

One can immediately see that this formula is one of strongest exhibitions of the Boolean structure of the model; one cannot even assign conditional probability to an event without using the Boolean operation of intersection.

Let b be another discrete random variable.

Models of cognition

Models of cognition

Models of cognition