Shure lube greasing-

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Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing

There are so many similar products and grdasing names that I think it is crucial to call a product by the same name as its manufacturer does. I'm confused. The advantage claimed is that a better seal, that is, an "air tight" seal, can be obtained in this manner since there will be no small gaps created by corrosion as is usually found when a rubber seal bears Shure lube greasing a steel axle surface. Can I travel about 40 miles to re-launch the boat without doing damage to the axel. Especially when you start mixing synthetic with conventional. Up to 34 gallon capacity.

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Please enter a question. The inner seal then bears against this non-corrosive surface on the bushing. Thanks for the info. Drop in oil level as seen in the clear dust cap is telltale. I'm hoping that Paulas tight pussy little extra grease around the rubber cover will help with preventing water intrusion in the future. A Bearing Buddy uses the grease pressure to deflect the plate in the Bearing Buddyand the spring behind the plate keeps pressure on the plate to generate positive grease pressure. If gressing looks good, leave it alone for a while and check it later to see if grease is leaking past the rubber seal easily. I'm not really a fan of the Sure Lube system, Shure lube greasing it is what Shure lube greasing is. Just what we were looking for. Latest greaskng issues you may like. Will this system not "suck" in water when you launch the boat with warm hubs? Use on wheel bearings including disc brake wheel bearingsswivel hinges, pins, winches and anchor chain reels.

My Sport came with a Karavan trailer equipted with Sure Lube bearing system.

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My Sport came with a Karavan trailer equipted with Sure Lube bearing system. This has a zerk fitting behind the dust cap allowing the grease to come out of the inboard bearing and out the outboard bearing as well, it is kind of messy to lube the bearings this way. I was thinking of changing over to bearing buddies as a better alternative.

Any comments would be appreaciated. If you don't remove that inner zerk , the inside bearing doesn't get any fresh grease when you lube the bearing buddy.

They have been doing this with no returned bad bearings. The air is expelled out through the back seal when you grease the unit. High Sierra. Five years of long distance trailering and salt water dunking and no problems.

It's really cool how you can pump grease in until it changes color and know that you have essentially repacked your bearings with fresh grease. The downside, as you pointed out, is that it is messy and you lose the positive pressure of a Bearing Buddy to keep water out when you put hot hubs in the water.

For that reason, it seems a very good idea to put new grease in on a regular basis if you have Sure Lube on your trailer. It was easy enough that it did not seem like a chore to do it often. I wish it was on my latest trailer instead of Bearing Buddies. Seeing the old grease pushed out with brand new grease following in its place was oddly satisfying. When you add grease, you add it on the back.

If you want to repack, just pull the bearing buddy and pump from the back till you get clean grease. Messy, but no more so that taking things apart to repack, and a lot quicker. If the axle had been bad I would have replace it with a torsion axle with shure lube spindles. Also most boat trailer manufactures who have tried the oil lube method have gone back to the regular grease type.

It sounds like the answer! I carefully studied it and came to the conclusion that the factory idea is much better in getting the lube to the rear seal. So much for that idea. That Las Vegas dealership may be correct. About three years ago, I had the axles replaced on my 25 Outrage trailer just as a preventive maintenance measure, originally fitted with plain axles and Bearing Buddies, which worked fine for 12 years.

The dealership, without mentioning it, replaced them with the new Spindle Lube axles, which I did not want. He said "no problem, I'll just install Bearing Buddies instead of their dust cap, and everything will be fine. Well, two years later, it wasn't, and an inner bearing completely failed, ruining a week's planned vacation. I do not believe the two systems are compatible at all, although each by itself seems to be fine. On a new Continental trailer I recently ordered, I wised up and specified plain spindles and Bearing Buddies as an alternate to the Spindle Lube axles they now furnish as standard equipment, since Bearing Buddies have been working for me for 20 years now, and I am comfortable with them.

Just don't mix and match the two systems. I think they are TieDown brand but could be wrong. It was a couple of years ago. Did you lube them from the Spindle Lube zerk or the Bearing Buddy zerk?

The spare out in the truck says "T. E ATL. In every case of bearing failure it was always the inner bearing. I've had em for two yrs with no problems what so ever. No grease, just heavy oil Is this comparable to the "Turbo Lube" that Ferdinando mentioned? Looks good, but I think it doesn't have that internal overpressure that makes the benefit of the original bearing buddy. Will this system not "suck" in water when you launch the boat with warm hubs? A friend has a Continental with the factory supplied Spindle Lube system, and he is having good luck with it.

My dealer tells me the people at Continental think it's the way to go. I use the Bearing Buddies with their Spindo Seal also. I will never go back to grease I was very surprised when I had opened the hub packaging and found the Turbo Lube set up.

I'm not sure if I like it. What happens if you bump a rock or curb with those plastic clear dust caps. If you lose all your oil can you still drive home? I don't think so. With a dust cap or even a bearing buddy you just knock it back on. I hope it works ok. I just learned to rebuild trailer hubs and bearings this weekend after fifteen years of boating. I had one hub that was behond repair due to a seal failing and then causing much corrosion.

Theres nothing like the smell of ten year old grease while swatting mosquitoes in the rain. Best weekend I've had in months. Big over the road semi's use a similar system on their front wheels. If water gets in it will turn the oil into a grey colored milkshake which is probably the reasons for the clear cap. Drop in oil level as seen in the clear dust cap is telltale. Water in oil leaves it's telltale color too.

Had an early version of oil bath bearing maybe 35 years ago. One side still operational and expect it to last longer than I will. Overall the Turbo Lube design seems much better and spare dust caps are available from Champion. Might not be a pad idea to have a spare. As was said, it is easy to see if the oil level is low or is dropping, and it is easy to see if there's water intrusion; it is also easy to drain and re-lube if there is water.

Can I travel about 40 miles to re-launch the boat without doing damage to the axel. The spare out in the truck says "T. If the plate can move when pushing on one side, this means that the hub is full and grease under pressure is pushing out on the spring loaded plate. See all 11 customer reviews. Southern Living. Disposable gloves are good for doing this job.

Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing. Reliable Sure Lube and Bearing Buddies

The Sure Lube system works by pushing out the old grease when new grease is pumped in, if I have it correctly. I'll double check tomorrow if I can get through to Karavan. Thanks again. The Sure Lube system seems to be the same as the Spindle Lube system. You should be good to go with purging the old grease with new grease.

Disposable gloves are good for doing this job. Based on what I know, this means that grease has gone past the inner seal. Does this phenomenon stop after the excess grease has been slung out, or is there a need to change the seals, and if the seals need to be changed, how is it done?

You might clean up around the inside of the hub and see if the seal looks like it remains seated properly or if the rubber is damaged. If all looks good, leave it alone for a while and check it later to see if grease is leaking past the rubber seal easily.

One thing to be mindful of with a Bearing Buddy: you only add grease if the spring loaded plate that the zerk fitting is threaded into does not move when you push on one side with your finger or a screwdriver. When adding grease, only add grease until the spring loaded plate just begins to move toward you.

If the plate does not move when you push on it, it means that there is room inside the hub for more grease. If the plate can move when pushing on one side, this means that the hub is full and grease under pressure is pushing out on the spring loaded plate. If you keeping pumping grease into the Bearing Buddy, the plate will push all the way to the outboard end of the Bearing Buddy. If you keeping pumping grease, the pressure has to go somewhere, so grease is either pushed past the seal or pushes the seal itself out of its seat.

If you need new seals, I'll see if I can walk you through the replacement. It really is a pretty simple, though somewhat messy project. Will it ever be a clear red or does the new grease become contaminated from the old grease? Any guess as to how many ounces of grease it will take? You want to be sure to be using marine bearing grease.

It holds up a lot better to dunkings in water. I don't think it would be a good thing to switch from chassis to marine bearing grease without completely cleaning the hubs out and starting over. What I have written above not withstanding, my brother-in-law has always used chassis grease in his boat trailer hubs and has never really had a problem that I can remember. I think you will be just fine with the new grease you have put in.

The grease I'm using is marine grease from West Marine. I'm new at this, but, at least, and as rarely an event getting it right is, I used the right grease, anyway.

As soon as the boat gets launched I'll have a pro look it all over. Appreciate your input. Not the smaller one that it sounds like you may be using.

I went through a whole tube of grease on one side before I was happy with the color. I'll inspect them and see how they look. No re-packing necessary just pump in new grease. I guess that's what attractive about the Sure Lube spindle system.

Again this site turns out to be very helpful. It is also not recommended to mix one with the other. I think this is based on the notion that when greases are mixed the particular properties of one grease may be affected by the other grease. For example, the high temperature properties of a grease might be affected by the presence of another grease.

This is probably something that lubrication engineers worry about. If you're on the road and your trailer needs grease, I would add some grease, even it wasn't the exact grease already in there. Some grease, even mixed grease, is better than no grease.

The guys at my local trailer sales, rental, and repair shop told me that the problem they often see on boat trailers with a Bearing Buddy is too much grease. People pump too much grease into the hub, forcing it past the rear seals. Grease being flung onto the wheels is not normal. You don't need to pump in three ounces of grease each time you use the trailer. If you do, you will just force it past the rear seals. Seals are a one-time use device, generally, so I recommend you have a few extra ones on hand.

Any time you have to take out a seal you will likely ruin it. The grease I refer to is wheel bearing grease specifically formulated to be used on trailers where the hubs may be submerged in water, such as a boat trailer. It is NOT marine grease. This grease is light blue in color. I have been using this type of bearing grease in my boat trailers for at least 25 years. The trailer parts store purchased product is: "Marine Wheel Bearing Grease, 14 oz. It provides excellent corrosion protection under severe conditions caused by salt water and air.

Use on wheel bearings including disc brake wheel bearings , swivel hinges, pins, winches and anchor chain reels. I'm sure this is right I hope so because it's what I did last year.

A void has been created which will not allow the BB to keep a light pressure on the system which allows water to enter from the inside. Be careful in mixing greases.

Some greases don't play well together. Especially when you start mixing synthetic with conventional. That said, is there a way to push grease past the inner seals with this system? I'm confused. They told me to just keep pumping the grease in and clean off the old grease as it comes out. Pump in normally without excessive pressure and the rear seal will be fine.

That's what the Sure Lube system is all about. By the way the "Big Gun" was just delivered I'm ready! I know nothing about the Sure Lube system. Sorry I diverged the thread, it seemed like a good follow on question. I agree fair follow up. We learned something Sure Lube system is different than Bearing Buddy, eh? I hope it can help others understand the different bearing lubrication systems available for our boat trailers. It has been in use for a long time and is the original product of this type.

The BEARING BUDDY has a spring loaded diaphragm which is claimed to impart a small positive pressure on the grease against the inner seal, and in this way it is said to aid in repelling the intrusion of water into the inner portion of the hub and its bearings. This seems like a somewhat obscure product. I don't recall seeing it being sold widely as an aftermarket accessory for trailers. It looks much like a Bearing Buddy, but lacks the spring loaded diaphragm.

In a diagram showing the product, it appears to be used with a special companion axle assembly in which there is a relief for grease to escape by flowing into a recess in the axle near the inner bearing.

Where the excess grease is expelled is not clear from the diagram. This appears to be sold only by Champion Trailers. This is a distinctly different product than the above two dust caps. In this product a grease fitting is provided in the axle itself. New grease flows through a channel in the axle and is released into the region near the inner bearing.

When greasing the axle the new grease pushes old grease outward until it flows through the outer bearing. Excess grease just accumulates and is retained by a conventional dust cap, often with a removable rubber plug. The grease fitting is not accessible once the dust cap is installed, but can be accessed by removing the rubber plug.

A grease fitting admits grease to a channel in the center of the axle which conveys it all the way to beyond the inner bearing. Relief holes allow the grease to escape the axle and to fill the inner area of the hub. This allows for inspection of the oil level in the system. The plastic dust cap contains a removable threaded cap so oil can be added without removing the dust cap.

All these systems use an inner seal which is constructed with a double lip and a spring to impart some pressure on the axle. The seals are rubber and bear against the steel axle as it rotates. I don't know what sort of pressure is specified to be contained by these seals, but I suspect it is not very high.

Just a slight pressure can push grease or oil past these seals. However, without excessive pressure a seal will maintain the grease within the hub for a long time. When a boat trailer has been set up properly with good seals and dust covers, many immersions into water can be made without getting water infiltration into the bearing grease. On a new Continental trailer I recently ordered, I wised up and specified plain spindles and Bearing Buddies as an alternate to the Spindle Lube axles they now furnish as standard equipment, since Bearing Buddies have been working for me for 20 years now, and I am comfortable with them.

Just don't mix and match the two systems. I think they are TieDown brand but could be wrong. It was a couple of years ago.

Did you lube them from the Spindle Lube zerk or the Bearing Buddy zerk? The spare out in the truck says "T. E ATL. In every case of bearing failure it was always the inner bearing. I've had em for two yrs with no problems what so ever. No grease, just heavy oil Is this comparable to the "Turbo Lube" that Ferdinando mentioned?

Looks good, but I think it doesn't have that internal overpressure that makes the benefit of the original bearing buddy. Will this system not "suck" in water when you launch the boat with warm hubs? A friend has a Continental with the factory supplied Spindle Lube system, and he is having good luck with it. My dealer tells me the people at Continental think it's the way to go.

I use the Bearing Buddies with their Spindo Seal also. I will never go back to grease I was very surprised when I had opened the hub packaging and found the Turbo Lube set up. I'm not sure if I like it. What happens if you bump a rock or curb with those plastic clear dust caps. If you lose all your oil can you still drive home?

I don't think so. With a dust cap or even a bearing buddy you just knock it back on. I hope it works ok. I just learned to rebuild trailer hubs and bearings this weekend after fifteen years of boating. I had one hub that was behond repair due to a seal failing and then causing much corrosion.

Theres nothing like the smell of ten year old grease while swatting mosquitoes in the rain. Best weekend I've had in months. Big over the road semi's use a similar system on their front wheels. If water gets in it will turn the oil into a grey colored milkshake which is probably the reasons for the clear cap. Drop in oil level as seen in the clear dust cap is telltale.

Water in oil leaves it's telltale color too. Had an early version of oil bath bearing maybe 35 years ago.

Bearing Buddy v. Spindle Lube. The trailer was new and carries my Montauk. I checked the bearings and one wheel shows red clear grease, no water. The other is not as red and it's obvious that water has gotten in. Can't understand one bearing being different than the other. I jacked up the trailer and tried to put new grease in until all the milky grease that mixed with salt wate,r would be replaced with the new grease.

The cartridge of grease held 3 oz. Well after almost 2 oz the grease is still "milky". I know it should be repacked. No evidence of metal shavings. Here's my question. Can I travel about 40 miles to re-launch the boat without doing damage to the axel. I would like to get the boat in the water and then get the bearings re-packed. Thanks for any help. I am not sure what Karavan's Sure Lube system is. I have used Bearing Buddy on trailers for years. My current trailer for my Outrage 22 has spindles that are Spindle Lube brand spindles.

These have zerk fittings on the tip of the spindle. The grease is fed through the center of the spindle to the inner bearing, then is forced out to the outer bearing. I have used these axles for over three years in an exclusively salt water application. I have not experienced any bearing problems to date. I have never repacked the bearings. I grease the spindles on a semi-regular basis, AKA, whenever I think its been a while.

I replaced the brake pads on the Tie Down surge brake system this past month. While doing so, I had an opportunity to spin the hubs. The bearings are turning as smooth as the day I installed them.

I believe if your Karavan's Sure Lube system is similar to the Spindle Lube system, you would be just fine pumping more grease through the hub, until you are happy with the appearance of the grease. A Bearing Buddy pushes the grease from the hub cap toward the inner bearing. Pushing more grease into a Bearing Buddy does not work, as you just push the inner seals off of the hub--not a good thing. You can buy marine bearing grease the blue stuff in grease gun cartridge refills. Buy a grease gun and a couple of refill cartridges.

These will last you a long time and you will have years of trailer bearing peace of mind. I hope this helps, Doug. Your answer was what I thought would be the case. The Sure Lube system works by pushing out the old grease when new grease is pumped in, if I have it correctly.

I'll double check tomorrow if I can get through to Karavan. Thanks again. The Sure Lube system seems to be the same as the Spindle Lube system. You should be good to go with purging the old grease with new grease. Disposable gloves are good for doing this job. Based on what I know, this means that grease has gone past the inner seal. Does this phenomenon stop after the excess grease has been slung out, or is there a need to change the seals, and if the seals need to be changed, how is it done?

You might clean up around the inside of the hub and see if the seal looks like it remains seated properly or if the rubber is damaged. If all looks good, leave it alone for a while and check it later to see if grease is leaking past the rubber seal easily. One thing to be mindful of with a Bearing Buddy: you only add grease if the spring loaded plate that the zerk fitting is threaded into does not move when you push on one side with your finger or a screwdriver.

When adding grease, only add grease until the spring loaded plate just begins to move toward you. If the plate does not move when you push on it, it means that there is room inside the hub for more grease.

If the plate can move when pushing on one side, this means that the hub is full and grease under pressure is pushing out on the spring loaded plate. If you keeping pumping grease into the Bearing Buddy, the plate will push all the way to the outboard end of the Bearing Buddy.

If you keeping pumping grease, the pressure has to go somewhere, so grease is either pushed past the seal or pushes the seal itself out of its seat. If you need new seals, I'll see if I can walk you through the replacement. It really is a pretty simple, though somewhat messy project. Will it ever be a clear red or does the new grease become contaminated from the old grease? Any guess as to how many ounces of grease it will take? You want to be sure to be using marine bearing grease. It holds up a lot better to dunkings in water.

I don't think it would be a good thing to switch from chassis to marine bearing grease without completely cleaning the hubs out and starting over. What I have written above not withstanding, my brother-in-law has always used chassis grease in his boat trailer hubs and has never really had a problem that I can remember. I think you will be just fine with the new grease you have put in. The grease I'm using is marine grease from West Marine. I'm new at this, but, at least, and as rarely an event getting it right is, I used the right grease, anyway.

As soon as the boat gets launched I'll have a pro look it all over. Appreciate your input. Not the smaller one that it sounds like you may be using. I went through a whole tube of grease on one side before I was happy with the color. I'll inspect them and see how they look. No re-packing necessary just pump in new grease. I guess that's what attractive about the Sure Lube spindle system. Again this site turns out to be very helpful. It is also not recommended to mix one with the other.

I think this is based on the notion that when greases are mixed the particular properties of one grease may be affected by the other grease. For example, the high temperature properties of a grease might be affected by the presence of another grease.

This is probably something that lubrication engineers worry about. If you're on the road and your trailer needs grease, I would add some grease, even it wasn't the exact grease already in there. Some grease, even mixed grease, is better than no grease. The guys at my local trailer sales, rental, and repair shop told me that the problem they often see on boat trailers with a Bearing Buddy is too much grease.

People pump too much grease into the hub, forcing it past the rear seals. Grease being flung onto the wheels is not normal. You don't need to pump in three ounces of grease each time you use the trailer. If you do, you will just force it past the rear seals. Seals are a one-time use device, generally, so I recommend you have a few extra ones on hand.

Any time you have to take out a seal you will likely ruin it. The grease I refer to is wheel bearing grease specifically formulated to be used on trailers where the hubs may be submerged in water, such as a boat trailer. It is NOT marine grease. This grease is light blue in color. I have been using this type of bearing grease in my boat trailers for at least 25 years. The trailer parts store purchased product is: "Marine Wheel Bearing Grease, 14 oz.

It provides excellent corrosion protection under severe conditions caused by salt water and air. Use on wheel bearings including disc brake wheel bearings , swivel hinges, pins, winches and anchor chain reels. I'm sure this is right I hope so because it's what I did last year. A void has been created which will not allow the BB to keep a light pressure on the system which allows water to enter from the inside. Be careful in mixing greases. Some greases don't play well together.

Especially when you start mixing synthetic with conventional. That said, is there a way to push grease past the inner seals with this system? I'm confused. They told me to just keep pumping the grease in and clean off the old grease as it comes out.

Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing

Shure lube greasing