Teen wilderness therapy program redcliff troubled-Teen boy escapes from wilderness program for troubled youth

For over 25 years, RedCliff Ascent's wilderness therapy program has helped thousands of teenagers ages 13 to 17 , young adults ages 18 to 30 , and their families find a new beginning. Through experiential therapy in the novel and challenging environment of wilderness, teens are able to prove to themselves what they are capable of and gain new insight about themselves and the issues they are facing. RedCliff helps put life in perspective while dealing with the issues and problems that currently govern their existence. Employment with RedCliff Ascent is more than a job — it's a lifestyle! Working with therapy teams and program administrators, Field Guides are responsible for ensuring student physical and emotional safety not necessarily comfort without interfering with the natural consequences provided by the wilderness.

They came out through depositions. After learning of his quest, many former ranch residents contacted Cowen with stories of violence and psychological torture. Redcliff ascribes to the belief that a student completes the program only when they have achieved Ten therapeutic goals. Philosophy philosophy of interuption is required for change. There are evidence-based methods and treatments folded into those more physical requirements.

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In the proper circumstances, we see youth grow as individuals and progress toward properly being able to deal with their problems and make healthier life choices. Who oversees it? Our program has a proven track record Daniel craig shirtless wallpaper help those in need for the long-run. In other words, they have an opportunity each week to dry off, warm up, and prepare for the next expedition. You will also have the opportunity to walk a path that promotes growth in your own life. Outback Students are issued top-of-the-line name-brand clothing and gear, including base rdecliff, coats, socks, hats, and gloves that keep them warm and dry. A free service, Help Your Teen Now is a program that is dedicated to helping parents locate the top teen help programs in their state and across the country. Two adults stand close by with watchful eyes. Back to the Blog February 1st Gap Year. Please inquire. Nestled in the DuPont State Forest near Brevard, North Carolina, Trails Momentum is a wilderness adventure therapy program designed exclusively for young adults ages with depression, anxiety, Teen wilderness therapy program redcliff troubled addiction, academic struggles, and progrxm overall lack of self-esteem. At RedCliff Ascent, the goal is to offer a complete healing of mind and body not only for the troubled teen but for family members as Teen wilderness therapy program redcliff troubled. Programming in the winter is a powerful time to enroll your teenager, because the environment looks and feels harder to manage. Yes No.

At dark Saturday night, one of the youths had been caught after he stopped running because of an apparent illness; the other seven youths are listed as still at large.

  • Nestled in the mountains of southwest Colorado and the Canyonlands of southeast Utah, the Open Sky approach transcends traditional wilderness therapy by emphasizing treatment for the whole family.
  • Work in some of the most beautiful outdoor spots in America.
  • When your child is suffering from depression , engaging in dangerous behaviors, or declining in school, it affects the entire family culture.

At dark Saturday night, one of the youths had been caught after he stopped running because of an apparent illness; the other seven youths are listed as still at large. I spun around and there was one of the kids winding up again. Grand slam. I figured it out right then. They were all in on it. I knew I had to take this kid out fast but then they jumped me and started pounding me on the head with sticks.

I was moving and ducking. I pulled one guy down on top of me to use him as a shield but another kid was teeing off on my legs, trying to break them. I was running through the scenarios.

I realized it was bad. The other counselor, Sunshine, might get away and radio for help, but then they might overtake her and hurt her.

If I kept fighting she would keep fighting and then they would have to hurt her. I threw my arms around the two kids sitting beside me and pulled them down to the ground in a bear hug. Then there was someone coming behind me and I heard Marty yelling, 'Sunny, don't fight! Don't fight! They hog-tied Marty and left him on the ground and tied me to a tree. The whole time they were tying us up they were apologizing. They kept saying it was nothing personal. They're just smart enough to be stupid.

I think they only wanted to go home. Iron County Sheriff David "Dude" Benson : "Our objectives are threefold: One, catch the kids and see that they're punished; two, protect the lives and property of our citizens; three, provide for the welfare of the kids 'cause they've done some dumb stuff here, but they are still just kids. It might do them good to spend a night out in the cold, maybe that and an empty stomach will encourage them to turn themselves in.

Marty Stock : "It was definitely premeditated. We had this inkling from the beginning. You get a feel with a group. The ringleader never hit me. He just watched. While they were tying us up we told them to take water, take food, take sleeping bags, take warm clothes, take the water purification drops. But they were scared out of their minds.

They were frantic. They were trying to act tough, but they were panicking. They said the reason they hit me in the head was they were trying to knock me out. I said they sure did a piss-poor job of it and they said it was harder than it looked in the movies. After they fled, I rolled across the ground and recovered a Swiss Army knife from under the tarp. Sunny opened it with her teeth and I eventually cut my hands free.

When I arrived in Cedar City, Utah, Sheriff Dude Benson, just back from a domestic dispute that had briefly distracted him from the search for the RedCliff fugitives, invited me into his office. The heads of two large, well-antlered mule deer hung on the wall behind his desk. Because the suspects were juveniles, the sheriff was not permitted to give out their names, but they ranged in age from 14 to 17 and came from all over the United States—Pennsylvania, New York, Connecticut, Illinois, Texas, Oregon.

The teenage desperadoes were eight of 1, kids who have gone through the RedCliff program, which operates out of the tiny town of Beryl Junction, Utah, 37 miles west of Cedar City. Headquarters is a nondescript tract house with farm sheds around back. Steve Petersen, a youth treatment counselor who wears a hooded wrestler's sweatshirt to work and has forearms the size of hams, cofounded RedCliff with three partners six years ago.

A few years earlier, Petersen had been working in a juvenile lockdown facility in Utah when he got permission to take eight kids to the Wyoming ranch where he grew up. They slept in the basement in sleeping bags, branded calves, and baled hay until they were too tired to move. They had all been getting this high-intensity therapy, but it wasn't reaching them. They probably knew more than the therapists in a lot of cases. They could give you all the right answers.

But outdoors, talk is cheap. Outdoors, you can't fake your way. RedCliff runs its courses inside square miles of BLM land. Tough, dry, juniper and sagebrush country. The adolescents—usually both boys and girls—are driven into the mountains blindfolded. Their gear is minimal. Each kid has been taught how to make a backpack from a tarp, a wool blanket, 20 feet of parachute cord, and 12 feet of seat-belt webbing.

Everything they need to survive—a large enamel cup, a week's worth of rice, lentils, raisins, oats, sleeping bag, sleeping pad, but no knife or matches—is rolled up inside. There is one counselor for every three or four kids. They travel through the wilderness in bands of 12 or less. All meals are cooked over a campfire and every night is spent beneath a tarp. There is no set graduation date. Kids stay out in the wild as long as it takes them to complete five "phasebooks" of wilderness skills.

The average stay is 56 days; the record, held by one particularly long-suffering boy, is Each kid participates in individual and group therapy once a week, often around the campfire; every night, each kid is required to write a journal entry, a poem, and three goals for the next day. The bands are almost constantly on the move, hiking through desert and mountains in degree heat or snowstorms.

Approximately 60 percent of the kids are sent to RedCliff by their parents, the rest by caseworkers or Utah judges who assign juvenile offenders to RedCliff in lieu of incarceration. Runaways are not uncommon, but they're usually caught within a few hours.

The December incident was the first time an entire RedCliff group escaped. Jonathan Mroz, 18, Redcliff Graduate : "We wanted to kill our counselors, too. We thought about it every night. On the hikes we would come up with ways to jump them. But we never did it—out of respect. They earned our respect. They were able to hike those 20 miles and take care of themselves in the wilderness. I was a little punk when I went out there. I was 15 and very violent.

I got kicked out of military school for fighting. Every time I got into trouble my family saved me—until they sent me to RedCliff. It was an awakening. It was humbling. I thought I was a big shit and quickly found out I wasn't. I thought I could kick the world's ass.

But you can't kick the wilderness's ass. Being stuck out there in the desert. What am I doing here? Why am I here? I didn't want to do anything and my whole group suffered. I was a runner myself; I tried to escape. I made it yards. The turning point was when I realized I was here and I might as well make the best of it.

I was out there for 90 days and, looking back, I wish I'd stayed out longer. Photo: Tavis Coburn. Sheriff's Office press release, December 5, P. Joshua Mendenhall, Redcliff Program Director : "Anybody who has had a fairly normal adolescence can think back and recall doing foolish things that probably had them on the brink of disaster.

There are three myths of youth. One, I'm smarter than everybody else and I can't get caught. Two, I'm immortal and I can't get hurt. Three, nobody on this earth has ever felt the way I feel. Spend enough time outdoors and you'll sort through all three. As soon as a kid accepts this, basically gives up trying to give up, he's landed. Then he's ready to learn.

We teach them how to build a fire with a bow and drill, how to build a tarp shelter, how to make themselves comfortable in the wilderness.

Human Resources Pacific Quest P. In addition, one of the most competitive compensation packages in the industry is offered. Blue Ridge also puts a heavy emphasis on staff training and professional development. The Fellowship experience is an intense commitment to fully devote your time and energy to Eagle Rock for the year beginning in August. Clients are provided with adequate instruction for winter camping. To do that effectively, Mentors teach outdoor living skills, run therapeutic groups, facilitate adventure activities, check in with students 1-on-1, practice mindfulness and other DBT skills, and generally role-model what it means to be a healthy adult.

Teen wilderness therapy program redcliff troubled. Why Wilderness Therapy

When your child is suffering from depression , engaging in dangerous behaviors, or declining in school, it affects the entire family culture. What may begin as a moderate challenge can easily become a serious crisis. Outback specializes in helping parents and their struggling teens come together to create healthy bonds, strong culture and a united family. Outback offers comprehensive assessment and treatment for teens ages in a multi-disciplinary wilderness program.

Our short-term, intermediate treatment options place strong emphasis on healthy relationships, increased self-efficacy, and a healthy amount of autonomy through skill building. Various studies back the idea that wilderness programs for troubled youth work.

In the proper circumstances, we see youth grow as individuals and progress toward properly being able to deal with their problems and make healthier life choices. This happens when a teen is able to separate herself or himself from their negative influences, detox from technological dependence and create strong bonds with others in similar circumstances as them. Wilderness programs really work to help teens on a group level as well as the individual level. Outback uses wilderness therapy in order to create a positive environment for the teens to experience the growth they need for success out in the real world.

For Outback, wilderness therapy means our students cultivate strong connections with both their family and their groups. They attend daily sessions and learn new ways to interact with the group. They also learn new ways to grow as individuals in both mind and body. The students work day-in and day-out in order to achieve these goals. In our program, teens will learn about important principles such as integrity, character and personal responsibility.

In order to maximize the effectiveness of our program, we have field therapists with the groups daily. The students get to take charge and problem solve as a group during their outdoor activities, but a field therapist is always by their side to help guide them through their day to day skill building. In addition to providing clinical oversight every day of the week, the strength based approach utilized at Outback is another factor that separates us from other wilderness therapy programs.

Strength-based approach is a collaborative process that fosters student engagement and investment in personal outcomes. Our approach allows for students to discontinue seeing themselves as someone who is broken and encourages them to identify strengths and capabilities. It is an approach that focuses on supporting students towards a path of internal motivations for change instead of external motivations for compliance. Rather than taking a prescriptive approach, we act as mentors and teachers; our job is to help guide the students in seeing and acknowledging their own greatness.

We encourage our students to make positive changes in their life by pointing out their strengths. Learn More. Areas of Impact Open Sky transcends traditional wilderness therapy by delivering an experience greater than the sum of its parts: treatment for the whole family, a powerful and transformative experience, a focus on total health and well-being, and an unyielding belief that everyone has the capacity to thrive.

Where We Are Learn More. Where We Are Durango, Colorado boasts an average of days of sunshine per year. Our Team Say Hello. Our Team Meet our team of experienced and dedicated professionals.

Say Hello. Ready to learn more? What's Happening At Open Sky Get the latest news from Open Sky along with informative articles written by clinical and program team members. More Articles. View Newsletter. Our Media Gallery Catch a glimpse of life in the field through our photo and video galleries. View Media Gallery. Young Adults View. Families View. Adolescents View. You helped us find the way forward with our son and our family. Thank you for your special work!

RedCliff Ascent Wilderness Therapy Program: Outdoor Field Guide Jobs in Southwest Utah

For over 25 years, RedCliff Ascent's wilderness therapy program has helped thousands of teenagers ages 13 to 17 , young adults ages 18 to 30 , and their families find a new beginning.

Through experiential therapy in the novel and challenging environment of wilderness, teens are able to prove to themselves what they are capable of and gain new insight about themselves and the issues they are facing. RedCliff helps put life in perspective while dealing with the issues and problems that currently govern their existence. Employment with RedCliff Ascent is more than a job — it's a lifestyle!

Working with therapy teams and program administrators, Field Guides are responsible for ensuring student physical and emotional safety not necessarily comfort without interfering with the natural consequences provided by the wilderness. A big part of the job is becoming a good mentor—helping participants discover their limits while having fun and holding them accountable to their obligations.

The group environment is a wonderful tool to help accomplish this. Whether helping with the daily routine or teaching survival skills, RedCliff staff learn to function as a team, both with each other and with the youth they are mentoring to reach new heights of achievement. Few roles are more fulfilling in life than the role of mentor, and few jobs offer the wide range of opportunities, which RedCliff offers to its field staff.

Hiking, camping, backpacking, beautiful scenery, wildlife, and dynamic interpersonal relationships all come with the job. RedCliff Ascent Field staff explain what they love most about working with troubled teens in the Utah wilderness or learn more about staff training. RedCliff is located in the beautiful red rock and high desert terrain of southwest Utah and covers an area of square miles. Many parts of the field are heavily forested with Pinyon and Juniper trees with Ponderosa Pine, Scrub Oak and Mountain Mahogany in the higher elevations.

Field elevations range from 5, to 9, feet. The weather can be unpredictable. Summer temperatures can reach as high as degrees with nights in the upper 40s.

Occasionally, winter nights can fall below zero with days in the teens. Normally deep winter days hang around freezing. The dry desert climate lends itself well to hiking and camping. Field Guides work an eight-day-on, six-day-off shift. The eight days are spent backpacking in the wilderness with the youth. During this time frame, you will experience the core philosophy in action and see what it's like to be a field staff, including wilderness survival skills, bow drill fires, camp set up and tear down, hiking, and backpacking as well as therapeutic and communication skills.

Benefits include dental, vision, and health Insurance offered after only 6 weeks of employment RedCliff pays a significant portion of premiums , pro-deals, and continuing education opportunities.

If you prefer a hike in the backcountry to a walk in the park, or waking to the wind in the trees over the sound of an alarm, then this career might be for you. Field Guides must be at least 21 years of age, have a high school degree or equivalent, have current CPR and first aid certification and love the outdoors. Applicants must also be able to pass an annual physical examination, pre-employment and random drug screening tests and a Federal Criminal Background Check. Successful applicants must be self-motivated, resourceful, mature, willing to learn and able to handle stressful situations with a sense of humor.

Wilderness experience is helpful; however, RedCliff will teach the necessary skills. To begin the application process, fill out the Job Inquiry Form. Be prepared to send three letters of professional recommendation, a resume with a cover letter and copies of all current certifications. We look for people who are humble. We look for people who are hungry. In addition, we look for people who are socially smart, and we look for people who are believers in the wilderness. We want people who are always going to be working on improving and learning.

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