Private bytes performance counter-Checking a Performance Counter

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. Working Set is the current size, in bytes, of the Working Set of this process. The Working Set is the set of memory pages touched recently by the threads in the process. If free memory in the computer is above a threshold, pages are left in the Working Set of a process even if they are not in use.

Private bytes performance counter

Charging commit for that many pages would be impractical. PerformanceCounter class. To start recording, right-click on the collector set and select Start. Similarly, these are the physical pages that are mapped to shareable committed pages in our process. There are a couple of ways to monitor performance counters in Azure.

Teen model melanie walsh. Shareable Memory

User mode is a restricted processing mode designed for applications, environment subsystems, and integral subsystems. One thing to look for on the combined graph is to check for patterns. Multi-spindle disk devices can have multiple requests that are active at one time, but other Private bytes performance counter requests are awaiting service. The value of this counter is in bytes, but this program does the calculation to MB when it creates the graphs. This counter displays the difference between the values observed in the last two samples, divided by the Private bytes performance counter of the sample interval. Sign in. Private Bytes is the current size, in bytes, of memory that this process has allocated that cannot be shared with other processes. Related So, if we are concerned with space allocated in the swap file then the Private Bytes counter is right on the Hot juicey pussy paris hilton. The operating system switches application threads to privileged mode to access operating system services. Feedback post: Moderator review and reinstatement processes. Memory consumption of the dtexec. Sign up using Email and Password. The Private Bytes counter is definately overstating the true cost so take it with a grain of salt, just like everything else you read on my blog. Committed bytes.

The Private Bytes counter reports the commit charge of the process.

  • I have 3GB switched enabled on server.
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  • The Private Bytes counter reports the commit charge of the process.
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  • I am not sure whether I am wrong or the Windows Internals Book 4th version is wrong.

Comment 0. But what do you really mean by memory? I never thought it would be hard to find a definitive resource for what the various memory usage counters mean for a Windows process. First, we will need a sample application that will allocate various kinds of memory for our experiments. You can find it on GitHub. Currently, it supports multiple kinds of allocations: reserve, commit, shareable memory, and more.

To monitor application memory usage, we will use Sysinternals VMMap , a long-time favorite on my blog. It offers unparalleled insight into what your application is doing in terms of memory. Simply choose a process when launching VMMap, and view memory utilization categorized by type private, shared, reserved, committed and purpose image, heap, stack, mapped file.

You can also run it from the command line, for example:. We must begin with the virtual memory size of the process — the amount of address space that is in use. Windows applications do not access physical memory directly. Any address in your application is a virtual address that is translated by the CPU to a physical address when accessed.

Although it is often the case that there is more virtual memory available than RAM to back it up, virtual memory is still limited. On bit Windows with a default configuration, each process can allocate up to 2GB of virtual memory. On bit Windows, each bit process can allocate up to TB of virtual memory this limit used to be 8TB until Windows 8. Each page of virtual memory can be in one of three states: free, reserved, and committed:. Free pages is available for subsequent allocations and excluding unusable pages, discussed later.

In other words, you may not access reserved pages, and you may not assume that at some point the system will have sufficient physical memory to back them up. For example, try running Memory.

Committed pages may be accessed by your application. The system guarantees that when you access a committed page, there will be physical memory to back it up. The physical memory is allocated on-demand, when you first access the page.

This limit is called the commit limit. If an allocation would exceed the commit limit, the system does not satisfy it. Go ahead and try it: Memory. To further complicate things, committed memory can be shared with other processes. Committed bytes. Reserved bytes. It can be calculated as the difference between non-free bytes and committed bytes.

Non-free bytes. Free bytes. This tells almost the whole story. The non-free bytes value is exactly the amount of virtual memory that is available for subsequent allocations.

Unfortunately, it is not entirely accurate. The Windows memory manager guarantees for historical reasons that new allocations are aligned on a 64KB boundary. Therefore, if your allocations are not all divisible by 64KB, some memory regions might be lost for future allocations. VMMap calls them Unusable , and it is the only tool that can reliably display them.

To experiment, run Memory. However, that memory cannot be used to satisfy future allocations, so it is as good as dead. As I noted earlier, physical memory can be shared across multiple processes: more than one process may have a virtual page mapped to a certain physical page.

Some of these shared pages are not under your direct control, e. DLL code is shared across processes; some other shared pages can be allocated directly by your code. All shared pages are committed, but not all committed pages can be shared. A shareable page must be allocated in advance as part of a section object , which is the kernel abstraction for memory-mapped files and for sharing memory pages across processes.

So, to be precise, we can speak of two kinds of shareable memory:. Shareable memory that is shared: memory pages that are currently mapped into the virtual address space of at least two processes. Reserved pages cannot be shared, so it makes no sense to ask whether they are private or shareable. It makes sense to look at the following per-process data points, to understand which part of its virtual memory is shared or shareable with other processes:.

Note that some of this committed memory may be backed by the page file, and not currently resident in physical memory.

Shareable bytes. Shareable bytes currently resident. Shared bytes currently resident. These are represented separately by the Image category. Try it out: run Memory. Shared bytes, on the other hand, should remain the same. You can also try Memory. So far, we only discussed the state of virtual memory pages. Indeed, free, unusable, and reserved pages have no effect on the amount of physical memory used by the system other than the data structures that must track reserved memory regions.

But committed memory may have the effect of consuming physical memory, too. Windows manages physical memory in a set of lists: active, standby, modified, free, and zero — to name a few. These lists are global to all processes on the system. We need to add to our monitoring toolbox the following data points related to process physical memory:.

Private physical bytes. It is also available in Task Manager as Memory private working set. Shareable or shared physical bytes. Similarly, these are the physical pages that are mapped to shareable committed pages in our process. Total physical bytes.

Simply the sum of the previous two metrics. Committed bytes not mapped yet to any backing storage RAM or page file. Only when the virtual page is first accessed, Windows handles the hardware exception by lazily allocating a page of physical memory. Unfortunately, there is no easy way that I know of to get this information. You can experiment with the on-demand physical memory allocation by running Memory. But now try Memory. This time, both the commit size and physical memory usage should go up by MB.

Committed bytes not currently resident. These are pages of committed memory that was paged out to disk. Kernel data structures like files, sockets, and mutexes are created and destroyed when your process requests it. Page tables that map virtual to physical addresses are allocated and populated when you commit and access memory pages.

Pool bytes. This refers to kernel memory directly attributable to your process, such as data structures for files or synchronization objects. For some kernel objects, the pool allocation is also charged to the owning process. Page table bytes. Mapping virtual addresses to physical addresses requires book-keeping, provided by data structures called page tables.

These data structures are allocated in kernel memory. Only when you actively access a page, Windows will fill the page table entry. It would typically be a fairly small value, even if you allocate a lot of memory. Experiment by running Memory. On my Windows 10 x64 system, the resulting increase in page table bytes was approximately 4MB. NOTE: Because any virtual memory allocation has the potential of requiring page table space eventually, Windows used to charge reserved memory to the system commit limit, because it anticipated these reserved pages to eventually become committed and require actual page table space.

In Windows 8. Charging commit for that many pages would be impractical. Therefore, on newer versions of Windows, reserving memory does not charge commit. You can verify this by running Memory. Hopefully, this post explained the key memory monitoring metrics for Windows processes.

You might also find the Testlimit tool useful to check just how far the memory manager is willing to stretch for you. See the original article here. Performance Zone. Over a million developers have joined DZone.

This page. For instance, many network card drivers utilize the Pagefile sometimes excessively and this can be misread as a memory shortage. These lists are global to all processes on the system. SSIS Pipeline performance counters , which regard the processes around package execution, management and specific data flow engine options. This is a measurement for only those latches whose requests had to wait, not all latches. That means it's actually possible for your application to have a memory leak that never manifests itself in the Private Bytes at all. Good luck.

Private bytes performance counter

Private bytes performance counter

Private bytes performance counter

Private bytes performance counter

Private bytes performance counter

Private bytes performance counter. Process Memory Performance Information

The swap space must be pre-allocated at a reasonable time such as loading a DLL so that we can deliver an error result at a reasonable time -- the time at which the virtual addresses changed from reserved to committed. So if we had some static data that could be modified, but usually isn't modified in practice, and maybe isn't even read, you would find that the Private Bytes counter overstated the cost of that storage.

The only real cost is the small bit of housekeeping to track allocated space in the swap file. No private memory need be allocated. In contrast, the output of vadump deals directly in what is resident and so, if memory is tight, it may understate the true memory cost because some things may have already been swapped out by the time you ask for the current resident pages.

However, if memory is abundant then swapping is not going to happen and you can get a true picture of all the required pages from vadump. And now a little data about our current product. Below is a table indicating the memory usage of the same managed notepad application Mark Russinovich wrote about last April.

The Version 1. Version 1. Selected Modules. NET runtime modules went up in this test case, private pages are way down k less and overall memory usage is down because of data savings in Mapped data and Other Data -- meaning there is less general overhead.

So despite the fact that the libraries increased in size this application requires less memory in v2. Most of the memory would be shared so the second managed application would have much less impact on your system. Disk Queue Length : this performance counter matters when it comes to disk overload, and it indicates the amount of non-processed transactions in waiting. The most important SSIS related performance counters are memory-related. The reason is simple: although SSIS processes acquire some of the logical disk resources, while reading from the source and writing to the destination, they rely heavily on system memory, physical or virtual.

Interaction of these two processes can be monitored through Processor Time Total performance counter. The Performance Monitor solution is a theoretical application which is tracing all of these calculations and graphically represents them according to the monitored sources.

Private Bytes dtexec. The Private Bytes performance counter acquires memory resources only for a dedicated process, and it cannot be shared.

The dtexec. Working Set dtexec. Memory consumption of the dtexec. Total Server Memory sqlservr. This process can overwhelm RAM, which could interrupt the flow of the other processes, unless it has a configured limitation.

Setting up performance counters - ANTS Memory Profiler 10 - Product Documentation

By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie Policy , Privacy Policy , and our Terms of Service. Stack Overflow for Teams is a private, secure spot for you and your coworkers to find and share information. Working Set is the current size, in bytes, of the Working Set of this process.

The Working Set is the set of memory pages touched recently by the threads in the process. If free memory in the computer is above a threshold, pages are left in the Working Set of a process even if they are not in use. When free memory falls below a threshold, pages are trimmed from Working Sets. If they are needed they will then be soft-faulted back into the Working Set before leaving main memory. Virtual Bytes is the current size, in bytes, of the virtual address space the process is using.

Use of virtual address space does not necessarily imply corresponding use of either disk or main memory pages. Virtual space is finite, and the process can limit its ability to load libraries.

Private Bytes is the current size, in bytes, of memory that this process has allocated that cannot be shared with other processes. Is it the Private Bytes which I should measure to be sure if the process is having any leaks as it does not involve any shared libraries and any leaks, if happening, will come from the process itself? What is the total memory consumed by the process? The short answer to this question is that none of these values are a reliable indicator of how much memory an executable is actually using, and none of them are really appropriate for debugging a memory leak.

Private Bytes refer to the amount of memory that the process executable has asked for - not necessarily the amount it is actually using.

They are "private" because they usually exclude memory-mapped files i. But - here's the catch - they don't necessarily exclude memory allocated by those files. There is no way to tell whether a change in private bytes was due to the executable itself, or due to a linked library.

Private bytes are also not exclusively physical memory; they can be paged to disk or in the standby page list i. Working Set refers to the total physical memory RAM used by the process. However, unlike private bytes, this also includes memory-mapped files and various other resources, so it's an even less accurate measurement than the private bytes. This is the same value that gets reported in Task Manager's "Mem Usage" and has been the source of endless amounts of confusion in recent years.

Memory in the Working Set is "physical" in the sense that it can be addressed without a page fault; however, the standby page list is also still physically in memory but not reported in the Working Set, and this is why you might see the "Mem Usage" suddenly drop when you minimize an application.

Virtual Bytes are the total virtual address space occupied by the entire process. This is like the working set, in the sense that it includes memory-mapped files shared DLLs , but it also includes data in the standby list and data that has already been paged out and is sitting in a pagefile on disk somewhere.

The total virtual bytes used by every process on a system under heavy load will add up to significantly more memory than the machine actually has. There's another problem here; just as shared libraries can allocate memory inside your application module, leading to potential false positives reported in your app's Private Bytes, your application may also end up allocating memory inside the shared modules, leading to false negatives.

That means it's actually possible for your application to have a memory leak that never manifests itself in the Private Bytes at all. Unlikely, but possible. Private Bytes are a reasonable approximation of the amount of memory your executable is using and can be used to help narrow down a list of potential candidates for a memory leak; if you see the number growing and growing constantly and endlessly, you would want to check that process for a leak. This cannot, however, prove that there is or is not a leak.

Rational Purify is another possibility. Microsoft also has a more general best practices document on this subject. There are more tools listed in this previous question. I hope this clears a few things up!

Tracking down memory leaks is one of the most difficult things to do in debugging. Good luck. You should not try to use perfmon, task manager or any tool like that to determine memory leaks. They are good for identifying trends, but not much else. The numbers they report in absolute terms are too vague and aggregated to be useful for a specific task such as memory leak detection.

You ask about a tool recommendation: I recommend Memory Validator. Capable of monitoring applications that make billions of memory allocations. The definition of the perfmon counters has been broken since the beginning and for some reason appears to be too hard to correct. A good overview of Windows memory management is available in the video " Mysteries of Memory Management Revealed " on MSDN: It covers more topics than needed to track memory leaks eg working set management but gives enough detail in the relevant topics.

To give you a hint of the problem with the perfmon counter descriptions, here is the inside story about private bytes from " Private Bytes Performance Counter -- Beware! The Private Bytes counter reports the commit charge of the process. That is to say, the amount of space that has been allocated in the swap file to hold the contents of the private memory in the event that it is swapped out. Note: I'm avoiding the word "reserved" because of possible confusion with virtual memory in the reserved state which is not committed.

Private memory, is defined as memory allocated for a process which cannot be shared by other processes. This memory is more expensive than shared memory when multiple such processes execute on a machine. Learn more. What is private bytes, virtual bytes, working set?

Ask Question. Asked 9 years, 10 months ago. Active 2 years, 5 months ago. Viewed k times. I am trying to use the perfmon windows utility to debug memory leaks in a process. This is how perfmon explains the terms: Working Set is the current size, in bytes, of the Working Set of this process. These are the questions I have: Is it the Private Bytes which I should measure to be sure if the process is having any leaks as it does not involve any shared libraries and any leaks, if happening, will come from the process itself?

Are there any other tools that give a better idea of the memory usage? Jeffmagma 1 1 gold badge 4 4 silver badges 16 16 bronze badges. Is it the private byte should I measure to be sure if the process is having any leak If private bytes of a process don't grow then you have no memory leaks. If they grow it might be due to memory leaks and it might be due to memory fragmentation. I think it is difficult to say looking at growth of private bytes what it means exactly.

So the relationships are: Private Bytes are what your app has actually allocated, but include pagefile usage; Working Set is the non-paged Private Bytes plus memory-mapped files; Virtual Bytes are the Working Set plus paged Private Bytes and standby list. Aaronaught Aaronaught k 23 23 gold badges silver badges bronze badges. I am afraid that you answer is not quite correct.

Private Bytes refer to the amount of memory RAM that the process executable has asked for - not only physical memory. Thus you can surely inspect most of the memory leak cases by monitoring private bytes. Try ::VisualAlloc to commit a large chunk of memory say 1.

You should be able to see that your private bytes are way larger than the working set. And Private Bytes CAN be swapped out - you can see private bytes larger than the physical memory you have in the machine. Aaronaught: Your first statement about reliable indicator and appropriate for debugging is confusing. Private bytes is a reliable indicator of a leak the application memory space.

It could be a dependent DLL and indirect but it is a leak in the application memory space. Can you explain why it cannot be used for debugging? I am not sure i understand why it cannot be used for debugging. Can you shed some light? G33kKahuna: It's not clear to me how a memory dump would tell you what is consuming the memory in any meaningful sense - unless by "what" you mean "what modules", but then all you have is a snapshot, you still cannot see which module is actually leaking the memory over time unless you take several dumps over time and under tightly controlled conditions.

It's hard to conceive of a more inefficient and unreliable debugging strategy. Profilers are everywhere these days; use one. Run a full! You can confirm by checking the eeheap -gc.

This should show you where the volume is stuck. Typically, if no hints are available with all of the above commands, your private bytes are consumed by uncollected objects in GC.

Now move on to either gchandles or gcleaks. The pointer is still there but object is gone. This is such categorical problem for unreleased event handlers. A previous reply to this question has given a great explanation of what the various types are.

Stephen Kellett Stephen Kellett 2, 1 1 gold badge 15 15 silver badges 24 24 bronze badges. I can't even run a simple class file in Java? What gives? I suspect that Stephen and Devil are somehow related or even cloned Sorry to disappoint. I have no idea who Devil Jin is. StephenKellett, Is there a trial version? Pacerier if you follow the link there is a trial for both the x86 and x64 versions just above the buy option on the left of the page.

Tetreault Apr 14 '15 at A: When it isn't resident.

Private bytes performance counter

Private bytes performance counter