Sufi lover and the beloved-Chishti stages of love – Part 2 – The Sufi Tavern

Muslim mystics treat God as love, lover, and beloved simultaneously. Therefore, created beings that contemplate the Real P esence and, through this contemplation, fall in love with Him, ultimately must be viewed as countless mirrors in which the Absolute Being contemplates itself in order to express its love to itself. On a fundamental level, the dichotomy lover-beloved does have a degree of reality as a spiritual seeker who is striving to achieve union with his object of desire. Having already tasted something of the promised union, the lover still perceives himself as an entity different from the beloved—the metaphorical ma-jazi beloved still veils from him the true one. This metaphorical beloved, that is to say, the beloved human being, however, is supposed to serve as a catalyst that purifies the lover from the properties of plurality of forms and speeds up his movement toward the oneness of meaning.

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved

They do not take notice of those who are not progressing along the spiritual path, but this is of course not the case in regard to the lover. The process of the effacement of self in being and becoming subsistent within Self is a paradox to the rational mind that dwells in the very heart of spiritual love. What a Superb note on the yhe Sufi lover and the beloved to Divinity - Very exact in nature and as stated by another, this piece of Sufi lover and the beloved speaks to the soul. The prophet Muhammad s. Why doth he steal, nay ravish that's thy right? Take mee to you, imprison mee, for I Except you' enthrall mee, never shall be free, Nor ever chaste, Secret messy facial you ravish mee. To conclude, let us rest the case on how one of the most quoted poems by Donne present the exact heretical, if I am allowed to say, Hallaj-like proclamations to Divinity. The fifth beloced has been styled estinaas desire for intimacy according to the Chishti Sufis: The sign of attachment with the Beloved Is detachment from all else. Because the purpose of the path is to reveal the inner essence of the wayfarer, Sufism stays attuned to humanity.

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The essence of the teaching is not verbal, but a direct communion from heart to heart. The integration of the shadow is an act of love that unites the opposites on a higher plane. Now it is time for silence. How can you see Layla with eyes with which you see other than her and which you have not cleansed by tears? This Sufi lover and the beloved still beautiful and has many poems upon which to meditate. The world's spiritual literature, which is now available as never before, also helps the individual to realize that his own desire for the beyond is a part of mankind's collective spiritual journey, which has always affirmed that Truth is an inner reality far transcending anything Sufi lover and the beloved can be found in the outer world. It causes a painful friction between the outer world and the inner world. Beauty unveils His exquisite form. Those who in this world live in joy and agreement with one another must have been akin to one another in that place. It is then that we consciously turn away from the outer world and seek the invisible source of our pain. The wayfarer begins the journey with a longing for this state of oneness. He said, "Who was your companion on the 'ourney? The memory of the beyond is like the grain of sand in the oyster Amateur housewife milf video that creates the pearl. They went to every prophet. Maybe later I will do it again.

In the rapturous lines of a Rumi or Hafiz poem, we discover intimate, sublime and passionate descriptions of spiritual awakening.

  • This book explores the relationship between the lover and the Beloved, that profound inner bond of love which is central to every mystical path.
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  • When someone mentions the gracefulness of the nightsky, climb up on the roof and dance and say,.
  • Beautiful article, it talks to the soul.

Sufism: The Transformation of the Hear t gives a clear and accessible outline of Sufism: its basic principles, historical background, and recent development in the West. While exploring the spiritual and psychological processes of transformation, this book offers practical guidelines to help the seeker.

Sufism is a mystical path of love in which God, or Truth, is experienced as the Beloved. The inner relationship of lover and Beloved is the core of the Sufi path. Through love the seeker is taken to God. The mystic seeks to realize Truth in this life and God reveals Himself within the hearts of those who love Him. The mystical experience of God is a state of oneness with God. Within the heart, lover and Beloved unite in love's ecstasy. The wayfarer begins the journey with a longing for this state of oneness.

The longing is born from the soul's memory that it has come from God. The soul remembers that its real home is with God and awakens the seeker with this memory. The spiritual journey is a journey that takes us back home, from separation to union. We have come from God and we return to God. The mystical journey home is a journey inward, to the very center of our being, where the Beloved is eternally present.

He whom we seek is none other than our own eternal nature. Saint Augustine said, "Return within yourself, for in the inward man dwells Truth. In the depths of the heart there is no separation between the lover and the Beloved. Here we are eternally united with God, and the mystical experience of union is a revelation of what is always present. The greatest obstacle that keeps us from experiencing this eternal state of union is the ego, our own personal identity. In the state of union there is no ego.

In this moment the individual self ceases to exist and only the Beloved exists. The Sufi says, "The Beloved is living, the lover is dead. Know that when you learn to lose yourself, you will reach the Beloved. There is no other secret to be learnt, and more than that is not known to me. The mystical journey leads us away from the ego towards the Self, from separation back to union. Turning away from the ego and turning back to God, we are led deep within ourself, to the inner most center of our being, what the Sufis term the "heart of hearts.

The Sufi masters have provided us with a map describing these stages and also the difficulties and dangers of the path. Having reached the goal, they are able to help other wayfarers by recording what may be expected along the way.

Sufism also provides certain techniques to open us to the inner world and keep our attention focused on our invisible goal. Foremost among these is the practice of remembrance, for the Sufi aspires to remember God in every moment, with each and every breath. This is not a mental remembrance, but a remembrance of the heart, for it is the heart which holds the higher consciousness of the Self.

The Self is the part of us which is never separate from God, and the consciousness of the Self is a quality of knowing that we are one with God. The practice of remembrance is a way of awakening the consciousness of the Self, and thus becoming aware of our inner union with Him whom we love. If you love someone you always think of them, and when the soul's love for God is awakened within the heart, the lover's attention is turned towards the Beloved. The Sufi path helps to make us aware of the divine consciousness of the Self that is found within the heart, and at the same time guides us away from the limited consciousness of the ego.

The journey from the ego to the Self is the eternal journey of the soul, of the exile returning home. In this world we have forgotten our real nature and identify with the ego. The journey home frees us from the grip of the ego and the illusory nature of its desires. We are led to the real fulfillment that can only come from knowing what we really are, tasting the truth of our divine essence. Every spiritual path leads the sincere seeker to the truth that can only be found within.

The Sufi says that there are as many roads to God as there are human beings, "as many as the breaths of the children of men. At the same time different spiritual paths are suited to different types of people. Sufism is suited to those who need to realize their relationship with God as a love affair, who need to be drawn by the thread of love and longing back to their Beloved. Sufi is a name given to a band of mystics who are lovers of God.

There is an ancient story about a group of lovers who were called "Kamal Posh" blanket wearers , thought by some to be early Sufis. Their only individual possessions were their single blankets, which they wore during the day and wrapped around themselves at night. They went to every prophet.

No one could satisfy them. Every prophet told them, do this or that, and they were not satisfied. One day Mohammed said that Kamal Posh men were coming and that they would arrive in so many days.

They came on the day he said and, when they were with him, he only looked at them without speaking. They were completely satisfied. Why were they completely satisfied? Because he created love in their hearts.

Sufism is the ancient wisdom of the heart. It is not limited by form, by time or place. It always was and it always will be. There will always be those who need to realize God as the Beloved. There will always be lovers of God. The Kamal Posh recognized that Mohammed knew the silent mysteries of love. They stayed with him and became assimilated into Islam. Islam literally means "surrender" and, while the esoteric side of Islam teaches the outer religious law of surrender to God, there developed an inner esoteric side which teaches of the lover's surrender to the Beloved.

A century after the death of the Prophet, small groups known as "Lovers of God" began to emerge throughout the Muslim world. They were also known as "Travellers" or "Wayfarers on the Mystical path," reflecting a saying ascribed to the Prophet:. Be in this world as if you are a traveller, a passerby, with your clothes and shoes full of dust. Sometimes you sit under the shade of a tree, sometimes you walk in the desert.

Be always a passerby, for this is not home. The inner teachings of the path are transmitted from teacher to disciple. Each teacher guides his disciples according to the principles he has received from his teacher.

The essence of the teaching is not verbal, but a direct communion from heart to heart. The Kamal Posh stayed with Mohammed because he created love in their hearts, and it is the inner communion of the heart that is the core of the Sufi path. The relationship of lover and Beloved is reflected in the relationship with the teacher who guides his disciples, or murshids, with an openness of heart and an understanding of the mysteries of love.

At the core of all Sufi practices is the element of love and devotion. Devotion is the inner attitude of the lover, and the nature of the Sufi path is devotional. The Sufi aspires to give herself to God as a lover to her Beloved. Devotion is an opening of the heart to the grace that flows through love. It is an attitude of surrender in which the ego and the mind are surrendered to a mystery beyond their comprehension. In giving ourself to God we allow Him to take us Home, and the quickest way is through the door of love.

In the words of al-Qushayri, "The inner reality of love means that you give all of yourself to the One until nothing remains of you for you. It is said that there are two ways of attracting God's attention. Either we make ourself perfect and then He has to love us, or we give ourself to Him and then He cannot resist our need to be with Him.

The attitude of devotion is an offering of our whole self to Him whom we love. This inner offering is a dynamic state of surrender which attracts the higher energies of love. Just as in nature a vacuum is always filled, so is the inner emptiness of surrender filled with His presence.

In the West we have tended to associate surrender with subservience and have lost touch with its hidden power. Surrender creates an empty space within the psyche which allows us to experience the power of the Self without being overwhelmed or inflated. Sufi practices are designed to help us to surrender, and to realize that we are contained by something far beyond the limited horizons of the mind and ego.

Stepping into the inner spaces of our own being we are able to experience the potency of His love for His servant. Sufism has explored the ways of love and developed means to help the seeker travel this invisible and yet powerful path. Because the purpose of the path is to reveal the inner essence of the wayfarer, Sufism stays attuned to humanity.

The deepest nature of mankind remains the same and yet surface changes take place. It is said that Sufism has stayed alive and preserved its dynamism through adapting and changing with the times and yet at the same time remaining true to the essence of the tradition.

The essence of the tradition is the inner alignment of the heart towards God, and the surrender of the ego that allows His will to be done. But outwardly, as society and culture develop and change, so does Sufism respond to these changes. Principles of Sufism. Von Schlegel. Berkley: Mizan Press, Tweedie, Irina. No hay copias impresas con formato de libro disponibles.

Four thousand years before God created these bodies, he created the souls and kept them beside himself and shed a light upon them. Beauty unveils His exquisite form. Arberry, The Doctrine of the Sufis , p. Those who don't feel this Love pulling them like a river, those who don't drink dawn like a cup of spring water or take in sunset like supper, those who don't want to change,. This creates a momentary awareness of our union with the Beloved that awakens us to the pain of our separation and forgetfulness. Love's most strange, most holy mystery— We are intimate beyond belief. Then she dreamt a long and complicated psychological dream at the end of which she saw a figure standing in a doorway.

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved

Sufi lover and the beloved. See a Problem?

The wild geese do not intend to cast their reflection, The water has no mind to receive their image. This saying was like a key that opened an inner door, and for two weeks I laughed with the joy of the soul at what I saw.

I started to meditate and discovered a reality that was more powerful and more meaningful than an outer world in which I came to realize I had long felt a stranger. He would also often liken the enigmatic nature of the path to that of birds in flight, "Look at the birds in the sky. Can you trace the path of their flight? The initial awakening of the seeker is a momentary glimpse of a different reality.

It is always a gift and cannot be brought about by the desire of the student. The spiritual quest is a response to a call: because He calls us to Him we turn away from the world to seek Him. Then begins the long and lonely journey home, the "flight of the alone to the Alone. His call catalyses a spiritual instinct that is within us.

Every human being comes into this world with two primary instincts: the will to live and the will to worship. It is this latter instinct that is so dynamically awakened by the Beloved that we are no longer content to worship Him, but we need to unite with Him. The seventeenth-century contemplative, Jeanne Guyon, describes this instinctual awakening:. As soon as God touches a seeker, He gives that new believer an instinct to return to Him more perfectly and be united with Him.

There is something within the believer that knows he has not been created for amusement or the trivals of the world but has an end which is centered in His Lord. Something within the believer endeavours to cause him to return to a place deep within, to a place of rest. It is an instinctive thing, this pull to return to God. Some receive it in a larger portion, according to God's design, others to a smaller degree, by God's design.

But each believer has that loving impatience to return to his source of origin. The Beloved has awakened his lover to the deepest need of the soul, to the hunger that is the driving force of the seeker: "Nourish me for I am hungry and hurry for time is a sword.

Spiritual life is a craving that cannot be satisfied by anything which the world has to offer, and its awakening can often be terrifying to the ego. For some people the experience of tauba simply makes sense of a meaningless life and they are only too glad to turn away from a world from which they already felt alienated. But there are also those who have struggled long and hard to realize their own independence and have made a successful life in worldly terms.

Hearing His call resonate within their own hearts they know what it means. They know that everything for which they have struggled will be taken away, not just attachments to the material world, but also the sense of being able to determine one's own life. It is this latter illusion of freedom or self-determination, which in the West we value so highly, that is often the most difficult to surrender. Although the only real freedom comes from the surrender of the ego to the Self, the ego resists this with all its strength and powers of persuasion.

Thus the seeker is torn between his response to the Beloved's call and his awareness of what this means. Yet the very fact that spiritual life evokes such a conflict and often a lengthy struggle of avoidance arises precisely from the individual's deep commitment, and his knowledge that once he walks through this door he will enter the arena of his own death.

From the depths of our heart He calls us and through the spiritual techniques of the path we learn how to come towards Him, how to enter the inner world. Meditation is usually the most important practice, for it refocuses the seeker, first by stilling the outward activity of the mind and then awakening him to inner experiences. Other spiritual practices can have a similar effect. In particular the dhikr, the repetition of the name of God, keeps the inner attention of the wayfarer away from the world and turned towards God.

Being part of a spiritual group and sitting in the presence of a teacher can also help to keep the wayfarer focused on the inner direction of his quest. The teacher and the group, charged with the energy of the path, function as a magnet, attracting the inner attention of the seeker and pointing it towards the heart.

On a more conscious level the presence of others for whom the inner quest is a real and serious undertaking helps to reinforce the individual's sense of purpose. Sitting with a group in meditation is a powerful reminder of a shared vision which beckons from the inner world. Similarly, the tradition and spiritual lineage of the teacher and the group support the wayfarer with the invisible presence of all those who have travelled this path in preceding centuries.

The world's spiritual literature, which is now available as never before, also helps the individual to realize that his own desire for the beyond is a part of mankind's collective spiritual journey, which has always affirmed that Truth is an inner reality far transcending anything that can be found in the outer world. All this support is particularly important in our Western materialistic culture which collectively denies the value if not the very existence of the inner world.

It gives the wayfarer an identity and a sense of belonging which is needed in the most difficult first stages of the path. The initial experience of tauba turns our attention away from the world. We then consciously take up the role of the seeker, the spiritual wayfarer making the journey back to the Beloved. This journey appears to begin with His call that awakens us, and yet He only calls those who already belong to Him, whom He has sent out into the world in order to reveal the secret hidden in creation.

Once I attended a conference in which someone asked, "How do you become a Sufi? You always were a Sufi but didn't know it. When she told the dream she suddenly realized what she had long suspected, that she had always been a Sufi. But this dream signalled that now was the time for her to fully recognize this. The journey home began the moment we left the state in which we knew we were not other than He. We surrendered ourselves into forgetfulness in order that He can know Himself more fully when we open our eyes and return to Him.

Yet although this return journey begins with the moment of separation, for many years it is unconscious, hidden beneath the illusion of the world. The experience of tauba is the shock that brings this journey into consciousness.

When the Beloved calls to us, the bond that exists and has always existed, outside of time and space, between the lover and the Beloved, is charged with the energy of love, allowing the higher consciousness of the Self to break through into ordinary consciousness.

This creates a momentary awareness of our union with the Beloved that awakens us to the pain of our separation and forgetfulness. In the moment of awakening the Beloved is present with us as never before. In this moment we consciously know that we are both separate and united with Him. As human beings we carry the consciousness of God, for our consciousness is part of the divine consciousness.

It is His greatest gift which distinguishes us from the other forms of life on this planet. Thus, in this moment of awakening He makes known His purpose to Himself. He reveals to Himself the hidden mystery of creation which contains His experience of the pain of separation.

Our longing to be reunited with God is none other than His own longing:. It is he who suffers his absence in me Who through me cries out to himself. Love's most strange, most holy mystery— We are intimate beyond belief. The lover has this most intimate relationship with the Beloved. In our longing we experience that He too is lonely, for He desires us more than we can ever know.

In our desire to go home He shares this secret with us: that although He is perfect He needs us. He needs us because we are imperfect and can share this mystery with Him. In the world that reflects His oneness all things are different. No two moments are the same and each petal of the rose has a different shape and a different color.

In this world created by Him who is perfect nothing is perfect, as the oriental-carpet makers acknowledge when they purposefully include an imperfection in their design. This is the paradox of creation: He who is One comes to know Himself through multiplicity. He who is perfect sees Himself in the mirror of imperfection. Our awareness of our own imperfection depends upon our deeper awareness of His perfection.

It is because we remember the state of perfection when we were not separate from Him, that our imperfection carries the hidden anguish of separation. Our own imperfection is most painfully evident in the experience of love. Without imperfection there would be no evolution; for the seeker it is the awareness of his own faults that makes him experience the primal conflict of light and dark, good and bad.

Energy is born from opposites, from the dynamic interplay of positive and negative. This is why the awakening is characterized as "repentance," for it is an awareness of our faults in contrast to the perfection of our Beloved that generates the energy that transforms us.

Thrown between the opposites, burnt by the awareness of our own darkness and our longing for His light, we experience the birth pain of consciousness: that He created darkness in us in order that we might come to know Him better. He embraces the opposites while we are caught in their conflict. Facing our darkness we struggle towards the light. Finally, worn away by the conflict the ego surrenders and we are taken beyond these opposites.

Just as we first awoke to the pain of separation and the darkness of the lover's imperfection, so do we awaken to the higher consciousness of the Self that experiences the oneness in everything. People often have dreams of the teacher acting in an improper way, swearing in a church, smoking in a meditation room, in order to shock them into an awareness of this higher reality. The perfect man embraces both his own imperfection and also that of mankind.

On being asked if he was a thief the saint replied, "What am I not? The path that begins and ends in oneness confronts the wayfarer with the duality of the world and God. Seeking the Beloved we have turned away from the world and now turn back to God. It evokes an intense struggle as the ego and the mind hold onto the known values and structures of the outer world, resisting the pull of the heart and its deep desire for the formless inner world.

But the affirmation is also a conscious identification with the quest and our desire for the Beloved. To help us in the struggle of turning back to God we give ourselves an identity as a wayfarer, a spiritual seeker. Rather than just confronting the total nothingness of spiritual truth in which the ego is annihilated, we give our conscious self something to hold onto, a ladder of ascent that can take us from the world of forms into the formless.

This idea of a spiritual identity is essentially a trick to help the ego to loosen its hold on the world. The goal is to become "featureless and formless," to lose every name until only His name remains.

For this reason when Irina Tweedie asked her Sufi Master, Bhai Sahib, about being initiated as a disciple, he replied, "It is not for you. It is a gradual death. It is said in the Upanishads that if you want Truth as badly as a drowning man wants air you will realize it in a split second. But who wants Truth as much as that? Before we surrender to the bottomless void that is beyond the mind we have to make the slow ascent that is our own crucifixion. When the Buddhist scriptures were first taken from India to China it was discovered before they were delivered that the scrolls were blank.

These blank scrolls contained the real spiritual Truth, but just as only Ananda understood when Buddha silently held up a flower, humanity needs to approach the great void more gradually. Scrolls with writing were substituted to help the seeker define the inner path.

When we first turn back to the Beloved we think of ourself as a wayfarer traveling a path. Gradually we realize that this pathless path is none other than our own inner being calling out to ourself.

Then the wayfarer and the path cease to be a duality. Finally they both disappear. But the idea of being a wayfarer on a path is a necessary illusion to help us cross over to a world beyond the ego. An essential part of this "crossing" is the focus on the Beloved. We cannot turn away from the world unless we turn towards God. We can only free ourselves from the desires that imprison us in this world through the greater desire that we have for God.

We escape from the gravitational pull of the earth by consciously aligning ourselves with the greater gravitational pull of the sun of suns.

Part of this realigning is the conscious recognition that Truth is an inner reality. The one-hundred-eighty-degree turn is thus a turn from the outer world to the inner world. It is a conscious commitment to an inner journey. In the words of Saint Augustine, "Return within yourself. In the inward man dwells truth. At the beginning there is a painful period of detachment as old values fall away. We often need more time to be alone and may need to change our style of living.

Slowly the outer world loses its attraction and this may also happen with old friends and old habits. Our focus has been redirected, and people and activities that used to interest us no longer hold our attention.

Similarly we can appear boring to people who are only interested in outer stimuli. Those whose identity and self-worth are determined solely by the outer world may even be threatened by the silent voice of one who looks elsewhere, who seeks to lose the ego rather than to gratify it. This is why a spiritual group is so valuable, providing a sense of community in a world from which the seeker can feel increasingly isolated.

This sense of isolation is emphasized by our Western culture because it has long denied the mystic. Since its early struggles against the gnostics, the Christian church has rejected the individual quest in favor of social and political power. Where is the wandering dervish or orange-robed sanyasin of our culture? The seeker's tendency towards isolation is even more emphasized in the United States, which, being the most extrovert society in the world, has little sympathy for the introvert path of the mystic.

Only too often the outcast carries the shadow of the culture, which in this case is the unrecognized longing for something beyond the material world. Those who belong to the Beloved carry His curse which is the memory of His embrace.

Nothing in the world will fulfill them. But when this curse is combined with the collective shadow it can easily become a feeling of shame. How many children are silently worried because they see a world invisible to their parents? How many adolescents bury their spirituality because it has no echo? These feelings fester in the darkness.

They become the secret shame of the shadow. We sense the emptiness of material values. We see that the emperor has no clothes. But without an outer context to contain or help us understand this insight we are left only with the primal guilt of consciousness.

Spirituality thus carries a double curse. A friend who was confronted with accepting her spirituality had a dream in which she let a cat out of a bag. She revealed her secret which had been contained in guilt. At the same time an unconscious feeling that she would be punished surfaced, for the collective shadow carries the danger of persecution; and our collective history is only too full of persecuting true spirituality.

During the period of owning one's inner aspirations the support of a spiritual group is invaluable, for then the shameful feelings are shared and taken away. The seeker is accepted within a circle of friends, within a peer group of souls. Wayfarers are always attracted to those with whom they have an inner empathy. This is the hidden resonance of a Sufi group which is recognized by those who belong. It is a collective memory of the Beloved, a shared silent longing. Four thousand years before God created these bodies, he created the souls and kept them beside himself and shed a light upon them.

He knew what quantity each soul received and he showed favor to each in proportion to its illumination. The souls remained all that time in light, until they became fully nourished. Those who in this world live in joy and agreement with one another must have been akin to one another in that place.

Here they love one another and are called the friends of God, and they are brothers who love one another for God's sake. These souls know one another by smell, like horses. When we find such friends we are like the ugly duckling who saw the swans and then recognized his own reflection.

The sense of relief can be tremendous. We have found a support that we need to help us on the inner journey. We can confront our own wounds without being overwhelmed by them.

We see God's curse for the blessing it is. We recognize our longing as the song that will take us home. Our face is now turned towards the Beloved and He calls us to Him. He begins to share with His lover the mysteries of love. In the tenderest, innermost places of our heart He touches us.

He opens us to Him, slowly lifting the veils that separate us. In these moments of intimacy the world disappears. Human lovers experience the passion and tenderness of union in privacy. Closing out the clamour of the world two people give themselves to an ecstasy that takes them into the beyond. But human passion is just an echo of the passion of the soul for the Beloved.

It is here, on the inner stage, that the real ecstasy is experienced, as lover and Beloved merge without the separation of bodies. We learn to long for the night, when the distractions of the world disappear and there is time for silence and the communion of lovers: O God, the stars are shining:. All eyes have closed in sleep; The kings have locked their doors. Each lover is alone, in secret, with the one he loves. And I am here too: alone, hidden from all of them—With You. Each moment that we can withdraw from the world is precious, for there is the possibility of meeting.

We look for Him everywhere, but in the world He is so hidden. In the moments of meditation He comes closer. This is the secret of the lover, that when we look within He may be waiting. What do we want of the world when we know His touch, the gentlest of butterfly wings on the edge of our heart?

Even the memory of such tenderness can incite passion. In a moment He can fill us to overflowing and make us forget that we ever left His arms. But these meetings make the world a cold and empty place. We wait for nightfall, hoping that He will be there again.

In the intervening hours we live as best we can, remembering Him. Driving on the freeway, working in the office, we perform our worldly duties but they seem without purpose. We feel we are caught between the two worlds, often unable to reconcile their opposition: the endless expanses of the heart with the restrictions of time and space. We live and work in a world that carries preoccupations about money, but what does the soul care about such things?

The journey towards oneness emphasizes the opposites and we are caught in their conflict. We live in this world and have work and responsibilities, families and mortgages that demand our attention. Yet we long for something else. This tension between the opposites creates a painful but transformative dynamic. It involves living the primal contradiction of incarnation: that we are both divine and human. As the inner experiences intensify so this contradiction can be more painful. We glimpse the dimension of the soul and are then thrown back into the world.

This only increases our longing, the feeling of separation that burns us and pulls us to the Beloved. The deeper the experiences with the Beloved the more painful the separation. The world seems the cause of this separation. It distracts us from our inner quest. In the early centuries of Islam some Sufis sought to avoid any such distraction by taking the path of the ascetic.

With a brick for a pillow and a worn-out straw mat for a bed, they despised this world, which they considered a dangerous snare on the way to God.

Even work was a distraction from their inner attention. The path of the ascetic does not belong to the present time see pp. However, the ascetic's attitude can be seen today reflected in the way seekers easily despise the mundane activities of life, and would like to escape from the time-consuming concerns that are a part of living in our present world.

Yet there is a psychological law that states that every stance of consciousness constellates its opposite in the unconscious. The moment we turn away from the world and look towards God our shadow falls behind us. Our view of the world then becomes contaminated by our own shadow.

What we despise is our own ordinary self. When we turned towards the Beloved we left part of ourself behind, the part that we did not associate with the quest. At the beginning this is necessary. It is an effect of the process of negation and affirmation.

I'm sure I'll come back and read this again a few times and get something new from it. Stay where you are. How can You place such big sorrows in it?

Jan 26, Fred Kohn rated it it was amazing Shelves: poetry. This book makes me want to go learn Arabic so I can read this in the original. Stunning poetry. I appreciated the glossary in the back to "decode" Sufi terms. View all 3 comments. Jan 01, Stephanie Jane Literary Flits rated it really liked it Shelves: fiction-poetry , fiction-asia. See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits This short book contains a hundred Rumi quatrains newly translated into English by Maryam Mafi and Azimi Melita Kolin and prefaced with an introduction to the poet's life.

It is not so much a book to be read through, I thought, as one to be saved and savoured, dipped into for inspiration or reassurance as the need arises. I have seen Rumi extensively quoted and referenced before, especially when reading Arabic and Persian novel See more of my book reviews on my blog, Literary Flits This short book contains a hundred Rumi quatrains newly translated into English by Maryam Mafi and Azimi Melita Kolin and prefaced with an introduction to the poet's life.

I have seen Rumi extensively quoted and referenced before, especially when reading Arabic and Persian novels, but I hadn't actually read a collection of his work before so wasn't sure what to expect. The four line poems themselves are deceptively simple statements which I felt could be taken at face value and satisfy.

They also however can be pondered to reveal deeper meanings many of which are religious or spiritual in nature but also seemed intensely personal which surprised me. Other than a brief glossary at the back of the book, the quatrains themselves are left to stand alone which they do of course, but I did often find myself wanting some explanation in order to fully understand what Rumi was saying.

Perhaps an assisted study guide would have been a better introduction for a complete Rumi novice? That said, I am sure I will turn to this collection again and it is a book I would appreciate more as a physical copy than as an ebook.

The historical significance of Rumi calls out for paper rather than pixels! Love and the longing for love are the strongest themes in this collection and personal strengths are also important. The following quatrains were those which appealed most deeply to me: Peaceful is the one who's not concerned with having more or less. Unbound by name or fame he is free from sorrow from the world and mostly from himself.

To be or not to be is not my dilemma. To break away from both worlds is not bravery. To be unaware of the wonders that exist in me, that is real madness. It's good to leave each day behind, like flowing water, free of sadness. Yesterday is gone and its tale told.

Today new seeds are growing. This book is significant to me in more ways than one. The most significant one being the fact that I received this book from a complete stranger forming part of a book chain that was initiated on Social Media. Much to the chagrin and jealousies of naysayers and doomsday prophets, the book link did not turn out to be a devious scheme designed to "Ponzify" its gullible victims. So without naming the benevolent individual who gifted me this precious book,I will just place on record my heartfelt app This book is significant to me in more ways than one.

So without naming the benevolent individual who gifted me this precious book,I will just place on record my heartfelt appreciation and admiration! Now coming to the book itself. This is a selected collection of pearls from Rumi's Quatrains. These seraphic, rhapsody inducing pieces, selected and translated by Azima Melita Kolin and Maryam M give immense pleasure to the reader.

Sensual yet simple; cheerily plain yet pure; melancholic yet melodious, each one of these gems sets the reader to think, experience and get immersed in the dance of words and the depth of meaning. A range of emotions permeate the length of this small collection. Scorn goes toe to toe with selflessness and love attempts a dangerous dalliance with rejection. Happiness is interspersed with hatred and forgiveness plays host to irreparable loss. A spontaneity that enveloped the swirl of human imagination and grasped the essence of the very cosmos.

A surreal sense of enlightened spirituality mingled with the alarming innocence of a rustic mind, lends to his works a heightened sense of beauty, realization and fulfilment. Without attempting to say more, Rumi says it all! The unimaginable economy of words opens the door to a universal expression of catharsis. The Rumi imprimatur is one which can be repeatedly attempted and aspired for, but never attained. The world is eternally indebted to Rumi for silently and steadily allowing himself to be drawn by the pull of not only what he really loved, but more significantly left behind as an immortal legacy to be savoured, cherished and raptured over by a legion of humanity that never cared for trivial punctuations such as caste, creed, colour, sex and religion.

Jalaluddin Rumi — The perennial poet of the past, present and future. View 2 comments. Jun 12, Zakirah rated it it was amazing Shelves: translated , mystics , poetry. I really wanted to avoid a westernised translation and this is a wonderful albeit short collection translated by native Persian speakers. Ever so sacred text on the beloved and his lover.

Rumi evoques the beauty of love which can be seen portrayed as a lover caressing every traits of the beloved face,inward and outward, so tangible and close, yet so distant and hidden.

The distance is like the one of heaven and earth or when you just meet the beloved it is even as distant as from the pit of hell to the mountains of heaven. The love he described it's almost similar to singing a worship song, with every core of your body, every Ever so sacred text on the beloved and his lover.

The love he described it's almost similar to singing a worship song, with every core of your body, every inch of your soul. It is beautiful and dreamy. A friend who also sings once wrote "hold it, hold it slippery edge, hang on to the first note that you remember from your own childhood. Follow it, you'll reach the place that will stop you from searching and stop you from wandering, you will reach yourself. When you meet the beloved, you will surely not be the same again!

Dec 24, Josephine biblioseph rated it it was amazing. It's a beautifully done collection and is very thought-provoking. Sufi mysticism hinging on a very romantic love of God, and something I've always been fascinated with. I think some facets of Hinduism are similar, at least when I hear devotional songs for Krishna, they remind me of sensual Ghazals I've also heard.

I'll have to keep flipping through this to absorb it all. I'm also partial to looking at it literally as well, but the mention of finding love within oneself is most tantali It's a beautifully done collection and is very thought-provoking.

I'm also partial to looking at it literally as well, but the mention of finding love within oneself is most tantalizing. There's so much to get out of these quatrains. Jul 16, Hager Moharram rated it liked it Shelves: books-owned. It somehow missed the mark with me although I adore Rumi's poetry. Jun 11, Alexander added it. It's a nice little collection of Rumi's poems that works well as an introduction to him.

You can read them once and move on or sit with them for hours and keep getting more insight out of a few lines of text. These poems made for nice meditations at the beginning of each day. Jul 06, Orla rated it really liked it. A lovely little book, one I think I'll come back to from time to time. Jun 04, Romy Hiley rated it really liked it Shelves: on-my-shelf , poetry , Jan 28, Hettie rated it it was amazing. Sep 03, Lucy Galvin added it. What can you say? Sufi poet May 30, Inna rated it it was amazing.

Rumi had figured it all out! Aug 04, Ibrahim rated it it was amazing. The epitome of succinctness - inspirational as frick. Sep 11, the never-ending library added it. This is not your ordinary ebook. Whispers of the Beloved is a charming 23 page induction to Persian Quatrains. Having an Iranian on the HC ebooks team I happily encounter Iranian culture on a daily basis, but I have to be honest — I had never heard of Rumi before. Jelaluddin Rumi, is a 13th century mystic poet and is commonly regarded as one of the most passionate and profound poets in history.

His presence remains strong to this day Madonna nicked the … um … very memorabl This is not your ordinary ebook. Basically they make you feel all warm inside — slightly squirmy — but warm nonetheless. Read more here Feb 11, Atalina Wright rated it it was amazing. Rumi was one of the first poets to capture my soul.

Discovering the Sufi Way of the Beloved | The Shift Network

The stage of exclusive attachment to the Beloved also has five phases. What happens that when the lover moves in company, she or he feels ill at ease with strangers and is afraid of being laughed at. People become her or his enemies and are prone to ridicule this lover.

We have not sent a messenger or prophet before you but when he recited the devil would intrude into his recitation Yet Allah annuls what the devil has cast.

Then Allah establishes his revelations. Allah is All-knowing, Wise. This shows that the forces of evil prepare their front against the lover, worry him her and try to scandalize him her. They do not take notice of those who are not progressing along the spiritual path, but this is of course not the case in regard to the lover.

It cannot be avoided that there is calumny or malicious misrepresentation in love. A Sufi has said:. The extremely pale face and heavy beating of his heart Expose the poor lover to ridicule on all hands. The second phase of exclusive attachment to the Beloved is called sedq truth, veracity, sincerity. It has been said:. Affectionate love is truth and sincerity And the one who is true and sincere, Is the friend of Allah. And he who brings the truth And he who confirms it — Those are the ones who are god-wary.

Some of the Sufis have placed the position of that friend of Allah who is really truthful and sincere, directly below the one of the prophets. Truthfulness is an attribute that pleases God. I have never seen one get lost who trod on the right path. The third phase of exclusive attachment to the Beloved is eshtehaar publicity; divulging; proclamation. It is the publicity of the state of the lover.

At this point the lover steps out of her or his egotism and does not care whether s he is held in respect or disgrace. He stayed at lonely places and when people got to know about his inner attainments he moved on to a place where no one knew him.

One day, however, he received the order to go to Ajmer in India and to settle there. From that time on he was well known. It is said that after his death he was found with these words written on his forehead:.

The fourth phase of exclusive attachment to the Beloved is shakwa or complaint, i. The prophet Muhammad s. How can a lover complain of his Beloved? However he or she can express his or her humility, distraction and helplessness before the Beloved alone and not before anyone else.

Har kasi dar jahaan kasi daarad Man toraa daaram o toraa o toraa Chu hich baab az-in dar tariq raftan nist Kojaa ravim o az dar kodaam dar daarim.

Az dast-e to ham pish-e to feryaad konam ze aankeh Chun joz-e to namibinam feryaad rasi raa. Everyone has someone in this world to look after him, I have none but You, You and You. As there is no other door to enter on the path I am following, How can I leave this door? Which other door is open to me? From You I complain to You alone! For — beside You — I see no one to whom I may appeal.

The fifth phase of exclusive attachment to the Beloved is — according to the Chishti Sufis — hozn grief, sadness. You may know that to the qualities of the heart belong:. Would that I forget all pleasures instead of the love of You, Would that instead of my life I may embrace the pain of You. The seventh phase according to the Chishtiyya Sufis has been styled mahabbat love, affection; friendship, esteem, benevolence.

Allah will certainly produce a people Whom He will love And they will love Him. Love is a gift. You cannot start to love somebody. The first phase is that of hosn-e akhlaaq or good morals and good conduct, in private and in public, in prosperity and in adversity.

At this phase the acts and deeds of the lover are praiseworthy and earn for him public esteem. His or her eyes behold none except the Friend and the heart of the lover does not think of anyone save the Beloved. The lover is aloof, yet in society, considering that men are fellow-creatures, he or she is polite to them. If you are with all, but since you are not with Me, you are with nobody. If you are not with anybody, but since you are with Me, you are with all.

The second phase is that of malaama wa izhaar-e sokr wa haira or the courting of blame in a state of intoxication and bewilderment. Your love turned me into a haunter of taverns, Else I would have been tranquil in mind. It is, however, important to know that these reports often come from a single source: Hasan Basri himself!

Now innumerable favours are showered on the lover and s he has to pass through many tribulations also. Sometimes the prophet of Islam is told:. Agar moraad-e to ay dust na moraadi maa-st Moraad-e khish az-in bish man nakhaaham daasht.

The third phase is that of moshaahadat-e ghaib contemplation of the mystery, witnessing the unseen. But this stage is beset with innumerable pitfalls; many heads roll here in the dust and not a few lives are lost. It is in such a situation that you are allowed the privilege of beholding His countenance. When you withdrew from them And what they worship apart from Allah, Take refuge in the Cave. Here kahf or cave means the cave of union kahf al-wesaal. This point comes at the end of the journey to Allah.

The fourth phase is that of aarzu-e molaaqaat or the wish to meet the Beloved. Someone who is not in love with the Beloved cannot stand the tribulations at this stage. The difficulties experienced will be overwhelming and the meaning of these difficulties will then be unclear to you. Hafez has written:. Nai dawlat-e donya besetam miarzad Nai lazzat-e hastiyash-e alam miarzad Na haft hezar saleh shadiye jahan In mehnat-e haft ruz-e gham miarzad.

During tyranny the treasures of the world have no value; During grief the delights of existence have no value; The seven thousand years of joy of the world Compared to the sorrow of seven days of adversity have no value. With the lover having reached the fourth phase of aarzu-e molaaqaat as referred to above by the Chishtiyya Sufis, the case is completely different. Agar be tir zanandam o gar be tigh koshand Be hich zarb o siyaasat ze to nadaaram dast.

The fifth phase has been styled estinaas desire for intimacy according to the Chishti Sufis:. Ask, at least once, what this beggar needs! One day fate related in my ear the tale of Your beauty, An unknown love seized me and reason and understanding left me. Love is the conflagration which burns the hay-stick of existence to ashes and uproots the tree of life. Shebli has said:. Love is the fire, which once kindled in the heart, Consumes everything other than the Beloved.

Love, O Ghaaleb is not controllable This is a fire Which neither can be kindled Nor extinguished at will. I am Burned I am burned, A bad reputation earned. Folks call thy lover a wrong number, Still across thy Tavern I slyly lumber. Love-making not our choice, God crowns the head He likes. Not Zulaikha wish to be Rabia R. Pay Salaams to Fariduddin Attar R. A , Discuss with Rabia, remove clutter. A Konya, This Soul is lighter than Ammonia. Truly am burned, am burned, This bad reputation I earned?

Folks call thy lover a wrong number, Dervish wake up from thy slumber! For love being a divine gift, Krish with Mercy fill this rift! This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Skip to content. It has been said: Affectionate love is truth and sincerity And the one who is true and sincere, Is the friend of Allah. But at this point there are many difficulties to tide over. It is said that after his death he was found with these words written on his forehead: He was a Beloved of Allah He died in the love of Allah. This may be a legend, but it is given as an example of the stage of publicity.

Again: Har kasi dar jahaan kasi daarad Man toraa daaram o toraa o toraa Chu hich baab az-in dar tariq raftan nist Kojaa ravim o az dar kodaam dar daarim. You may know that to the qualities of the heart belong: a. Allah says: I am found in those hearts, Which are broken for My sake. Sometimes the prophet of Islam is told: If you had not been, I would not have manifested My Lordship. This is the highest favour that you may receive from the Beloved: Chu az jomleye jahaan boridi man toraa aam When you have severed your connections With all, then I am yours.

Hafez has written: Nai dawlat-e donya besetam miarzad Nai lazzat-e hastiyash-e alam miarzad Na haft hezar saleh shadiye jahan In mehnat-e haft ruz-e gham miarzad During tyranny the treasures of the world have no value; During grief the delights of existence have no value; The seven thousand years of joy of the world Compared to the sorrow of seven days of adversity have no value.

Sufi lover and the beloved